A polar fox is fitted with a satellite tracking collar in Krossfjorden, Svalbard, a Norwegian Arctic archipelago, on July 29, 2017, as part of research conducted by the Norwegian Polar Institute. (Elise Stroemseng/Norwegian Polar Institute via AP)

Arctic fox walks 4,500 km from Norway to Canada

News comes from research published by the Norwegian Polar Institute

An arctic fox walked more than 4,415 kilometres from northern Norway to Canada’s far north in four months, Norwegian researchers said.

The Norwegian Polar Institute reported the young female fox left her birth place on Norway’s Svalbard archipelago on March 1, 2018 and reached Canada’s Ellesmere Island by way of Greenland on July 1, 2018.

The ground the small fox cumulatively covered over those four months was among the most ever recorded for an arctic fox seeking a place to settle down and breed, the institute said in a research article subtitled “One female’s long run across sea ice.”

Institute scientists monitored the fox’s movements with a satellite tracking device they fitted her with in July 2017 near her native habitat by a glacier on Norway’s Spitsbergen island. She stayed close to home then gradually ventured out until she left the island on March 26, 2018.

During the walk to Canada, the roughly two-year-old fox moved at an average rate of 46.3 kilometres per day, the Norwegian scientists said.

“The short span of time spent covering such a distance highlights the exceptional movement capacity of this small-sized carnivore species,” they said.

READ MORE: Shelter reunites Alberta cat with its Vancouver Island family

The distance between the fox’s natal den and where she settled on Ellesmere Island was 1,789 kilometres if travelled in a straight line, according to the institute.

The sea ice allows Norway’s arctic foxes to reach Greenland and then North America, though it’s not known why they leave their birth places in search of places to breed, the researchers said.

The animals, which have thick fur to survive cold environments and live to about age four, subsist on fish, marine birds and lemmings.

The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Back in time

55 YEARS AGO: A toboggan party was enjoyed by the Teen Town… Continue reading

Clearwater’s North Thompson Complex packed with Winterfest fun

By K.A. Pendergrast Friday, Jan.17 helped kick off the Clearwater Hockey Days/Winterfest… Continue reading

Vavenby resident working at refuge witnesses volcano eruption

By Robyn Rexin Twenty-seven-year-old Vavenby resident Vienna Moilliet is working as a… Continue reading

Literacy Week coming to Clearwater with lots of reading-related events

Clearwater will be celebrating Family Literacy Week (Jan. 26 to Feb. 2)… Continue reading

Don’t be surprised to see Vikings in Wells Gray

The Vikings are coming to Clearwater. On Feb. 1, the Wells Gray… Continue reading

VIDEO: Canada’s first presumptive case of coronavirus officially confirmed

Both patient and wife arrived on a China Southern Airlines flight after having been to Wuhan

Swapping grape varieties can help winemakers adapt to climate change: UBC study

Report says 56% of wine-grape-growing regions would be lost if global climate warms by 2 C

Alberta premier wants feds to approve Teck mine for benefit of First Nations

Kenney: ‘Surely [reconciliation] means saying yes to economic development for First Nations people’

Police search for man who went missing from Vernon hotel

Jay Rosenberger, 38, was last seen Friday

NDP suggests easing secondary housing rules for B.C. farmland

Lana Popham proposes guest homes not just for relatives

After four sexual assaults in the same B.C. park, RCMP ask women not to walk alone

Four sexual assaults took place in Glen Park over two months

BC Place lights up in purple and yellow to honour Kobe Bryant

Kobe Bryant, his 13-year-old daughter and seven others were killed in a helicopter crash

Whistleblower says Iranian-Americans questioned at Peace Arch crossing were targeted

Immigration lawyer says response from Customs Border Protection is a ‘total cover up’

Most Read