Indigenous

Rafter 25 Ranch west of Williams Lake is one of the properties affected by a 2014 court decision transferring title to a vast area of of the region to Tsilhqot’in Nation. (Rafter 25 Ranch)

Cariboo ranchers, lodge operators say Indigenous land title shuts them out

Tsilhqot’in jurisdiction affects grazing, access to private property

Rafter 25 Ranch west of Williams Lake is one of the properties affected by a 2014 court decision transferring title to a vast area of of the region to Tsilhqot’in Nation. (Rafter 25 Ranch)
Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett takes her seat as she wait to appear before the Indigenous and Northern Affairs committee in Ottawa on March 10, 2020. Disheartened, disappointed, disbelieving. But still determined. Indigenous women and leaders fighting to end violence against Indigenous women in Canada say that’s how they feel about Wednesday’s anniversary of the final report of the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Families of victims who shared painful testimonies about the deaths and disappearances of their loved ones hoped their truths would spark immediate action and meaningful change. But Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett’s announcement last week that Ottawa is delaying its national action plan because of the COVID-19 pandemic has instead sparked widespread dismay.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Federal delay of MMIWG action plan sparks dismay ahead of inquiry anniversary

Marion Buller, chief commissioner of the inquiry, said she doesn’t buy the pandemic as an explanation for the delay

Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett takes her seat as she wait to appear before the Indigenous and Northern Affairs committee in Ottawa on March 10, 2020. Disheartened, disappointed, disbelieving. But still determined. Indigenous women and leaders fighting to end violence against Indigenous women in Canada say that’s how they feel about Wednesday’s anniversary of the final report of the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Families of victims who shared painful testimonies about the deaths and disappearances of their loved ones hoped their truths would spark immediate action and meaningful change. But Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett’s announcement last week that Ottawa is delaying its national action plan because of the COVID-19 pandemic has instead sparked widespread dismay.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. (The Canadian Press)

Feds provide more funds to help remote Indigenous communities cope with pandemic

The new funding is on top of the $305-million Indigenous Community Support Fund

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. (The Canadian Press)
Because Canada does not have a national broadband strategy, telecommunications companies require every community to submit a business case. The First Nations Technology Council would like to see all First Nations communities connected to technology.(Angie Mindus file photo)

COVID-19 highlights lack of connectivity in First Nations communities

Many don’t have access required to utilize online platforms, says First Nations Technology Council

Because Canada does not have a national broadband strategy, telecommunications companies require every community to submit a business case. The First Nations Technology Council would like to see all First Nations communities connected to technology.(Angie Mindus file photo)
(AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

First Nations health authorities tell Commons committee they need more PPE

First Nations Health Council of B.C. says access to PPE has also been a concern for First Nations

(AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (The Canadian Press)

Trudeau promises $75M more for off-reserve Indigenous services in pandemic

Liberals have promised $290 million for organizations representing First Nations, Metis and Inuit people

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (The Canadian Press)
Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller listens to chiefs as they line up to speak during a session at the AFN Special Chiefs Assembly in Ottawa, Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Health researcher hopes COVID-19 means new policies for Indigenous peoples

The federal government has reported at least 190 confirmed cases of COVID-19 on reserves

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller listens to chiefs as they line up to speak during a session at the AFN Special Chiefs Assembly in Ottawa, Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
(The Canadian Press)

Mixed messages: Ottawa, Moe differ on Indigenous ceremonies during pandemic

Indigenous community leaders know what needs to be done to keep people safe, PM says

(The Canadian Press)
University students and others claiming to support Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs stage a protest camp against the Coastal Gaslink pipeline at the B.C. legislature, Feb. 20, 2020. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

Elected Wet’suwet’en chief blasts closed-door land title deal

Hereditary chiefs have been ‘wined and dined’ for 23 years

University students and others claiming to support Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs stage a protest camp against the Coastal Gaslink pipeline at the B.C. legislature, Feb. 20, 2020. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)
Federal Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett in Smithers, B.C. on Feb. 28, 2020. (The Canadian Press)

Wet’suwet’en elected chiefs call on Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister to resign

Wet’suwet’en are governed by both a traditional hereditary chief system and elected band councils.

Federal Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett in Smithers, B.C. on Feb. 28, 2020. (The Canadian Press)
FILE – An eagle feather is held up during a rally for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on October 4, 2016. With reports of a sharp rise in violence against Indigenous women as COVID-19 restrictions keep families stuck in their homes, concerns are being raised about whether the pandemic could delay the promised June delivery of a national action plan on missing and murdered Indigenous women. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Violence against Indigenous women during COVID-19 sparks calls for MMIWG plan

One in five Indigenous woman told survey takers they’d experience violence in past three months

FILE – An eagle feather is held up during a rally for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on October 4, 2016. With reports of a sharp rise in violence against Indigenous women as COVID-19 restrictions keep families stuck in their homes, concerns are being raised about whether the pandemic could delay the promised June delivery of a national action plan on missing and murdered Indigenous women. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Dene National Chief Norman Yakeleya, shown in a handout photo, says he called on people to return to the land to find food and healing during the COVID-19 pandemic. He says the blood of the Dene people is in the land. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO

‘Go back to the old way:’ First Nations return to land during COVID-19 pandemic

Leaders are encouraging their communities to hunt and fish, and to gather berries and traditional medicines

Dene National Chief Norman Yakeleya, shown in a handout photo, says he called on people to return to the land to find food and healing during the COVID-19 pandemic. He says the blood of the Dene people is in the land. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO
B.C. Indigenous Relations Minister Scott Fraser and Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett speak briefly to the press following Thursday’s discussions with the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs. (Quinn Bender photo)

EXCLUSIVE: A first look at the Wet’suwet’en land title agreement with B.C., Ottawa

Exclusive and/or shared jurisdiction will be handed over to First Nation houses over time

B.C. Indigenous Relations Minister Scott Fraser and Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett speak briefly to the press following Thursday’s discussions with the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs. (Quinn Bender photo)
Marching down Highway 16 in February 2019 in Smithers. B.C., chiefs gather in Smithers to support Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs’ position on Unist’ot’en camp and opposition to Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline. (Chris Gareau photo)

Wet’suwet’en agree to sign memorandum on rights and title with B.C., Ottawa

Details surrounding the deal have not been released and remain confidential

Marching down Highway 16 in February 2019 in Smithers. B.C., chiefs gather in Smithers to support Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs’ position on Unist’ot’en camp and opposition to Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline. (Chris Gareau photo)
FILE – Protesters speak to Ontario Provincial Police officers at a rail blockade in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory, near Belleville, Ont., on Monday Feb. 24, 2020, as they protest in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en Nation hereditary chiefs attempting to halt construction of a natural gas pipeline on their traditional territories. Analysts say Canadian National Railway Co. saw lower freight volumes last quarter due to rolling blockades that halted rail traffic across swathes of the country in February. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

Blockades expected to derail CN’s Q1 results, COVID-19 looms down the line

Multiple blockades popped up all over Canada in support of Wet’suwet’en

FILE – Protesters speak to Ontario Provincial Police officers at a rail blockade in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory, near Belleville, Ont., on Monday Feb. 24, 2020, as they protest in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en Nation hereditary chiefs attempting to halt construction of a natural gas pipeline on their traditional territories. Analysts say Canadian National Railway Co. saw lower freight volumes last quarter due to rolling blockades that halted rail traffic across swathes of the country in February. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg
Released prisoner tests positive for COVID-19, exposes Tl’etinqox First Nations community to virus

Released prisoner tests positive for COVID-19, exposes Tl’etinqox First Nations community to virus

Chief Joe Alphonse asks residents of rural community to stay within their homes and self-isolate

Released prisoner tests positive for COVID-19, exposes Tl’etinqox First Nations community to virus
A photo shared by family to Facebook of April Parisian’s truck and camper.

Homicide investigators called in after man dies in camper belonging to missing B.C. woman

The search for April Lee-Ann Parisian remains ongoing

A photo shared by family to Facebook of April Parisian’s truck and camper.
The Supreme Court of Canada is seen, Thursday January 16, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

B.C. First Nations want to launch fight of Trans Mountain pipeline approval

Last month, the Supreme Court of Canada decided not to hear five challenges about the pipeline

The Supreme Court of Canada is seen, Thursday January 16, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Tl’etinqox Chief Joe Alphonse encourages all band members to err on the side of caution in light of the coronavirus. (File photo)

B.C. First Nation chief urges caution in rural areas amid COVID-19

“We all have to do our part and look out for one another”

Tl’etinqox Chief Joe Alphonse encourages all band members to err on the side of caution in light of the coronavirus. (File photo)
National Chief Perry Bellegarde is seen during a speech at the Assembly of First Nations Special Chiefs Assembly in Ottawa, Tuesday December 3, 2019. Leaders of Canada’s national Indigenous organizations say they hope talks with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Canada’s premiers will lead to greater movement on implementing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and new child welfare policies as well as resources to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Indigenous leaders to meet with premiers, Trudeau on child welfare, UNDRIP

The leaders plan to raise a number of issues, including the UN declaration

National Chief Perry Bellegarde is seen during a speech at the Assembly of First Nations Special Chiefs Assembly in Ottawa, Tuesday December 3, 2019. Leaders of Canada’s national Indigenous organizations say they hope talks with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Canada’s premiers will lead to greater movement on implementing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and new child welfare policies as well as resources to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld