Researcher seeks more bobcat and lynx photos

I am a graduate student at UBC-Okanagan collecting photos of bobcats and lynx from the public

Photo taken from a trail camera shows a somewhat curious looking bobcat.

Photo taken from a trail camera shows a somewhat curious looking bobcat.

Editor, The Times:

This past winter you published an article about the bobcat and lynx study that I am doing. Just to remind you, I am a graduate student at UBC-Okanagan collecting photos of bobcats and lynx from the public to map the provincial distribution of each species. I think that bobcats and lynx have shifted their range in B.C. in response to climate change.

To date I have received over 3,000 photos from all across the province.

Bobcats have been detected throughout the southern half of the province, typically at low elevations. Lynx have been detected throughout the province, typically at high elevations, as expected.

However, there have been some surprises – bobcats have been detected much farther north than I expected, even in the Cariboo and Omineca regions.

I am doing one final push for photos and would greatly appreciate it if you are able to squeeze in another short notice about the project and my search for photos.

We are seeking photos of bobcats and lynx captured by trail cameras or conventional cameras, from all corners of the province and from all time periods to help determine the provincial distribution of each species.

The photos do not have to be great photography – they just have to show a bobcat or a lynx, or even just a part of one. Photos can be blurry or dark and don’t even have to clearly show which cat species is present.

Photos will not be published or shared with anyone without permission, and photographers will retain ownership of their photos.

The results of this study will be gladly shared with all those who are interested.

Please send photos, along with the date and location of each photo, to TJ Gooliaff at tj.gooliaff@ubc.ca”

TJ Gooliaff, MSc student

University of British Columbia Okanagan

Biologist in Training (BIT)

Bobcat/Lynx poster