Kinder Morgan project does not make economic sense

Kinder Morgan project does not make economic sense

You can’t run an economy on ideology. There’s nothing but chaos and ruin in that!

Editor, The Times:

The opposition to the Trans Mountain is real – some 5,000 souls against to a pitiful 300 for (most of them bused in).

Now, some of the opposition, even to me as an individual opposed to this project, seems to be somewhat irrational. After all, who cares about some snails getting crushed by the laying of the pipe?

No, my opposition has no socialist and environmental fuzziness. It’s strictly hardline capitalist. Look at the bottom line. And the bottom line doesn’t look good.

READ MORE: Protesters back at Kinder Morgan site (Mar. 16, 2018)

How can selling Athabaska tar for less than the cost of production be in Canada’s strategic interest, whether shipped by rail or down a new pipeline?

In this I’m quoting from respected economists like Robyn Allen and number cruncher supremo Jeff Rubin.

In fact, so much of this pro-pipeline propaganda appears to be based on fantasy and fear. Oh, if you don’t twin that pipeline, economic woe will stalk the land.

Scotiabank has sent out the alarm – Pipeline woes threaten Canada’s ability to compete – Financial Post, April 11.

Could all this be because Scotiabank has stuck its neck out so far with the Trans Mountain thing?

As Naomi Klein pointed out in Shock Doctrine, Canada’s banks and business world routinely cries doom and gloom about Canada’s economy, even when it’s doing well. When oh when is the Right going to learn what the Left had to a long time ago? You can’t run an economy on ideology. There’s nothing but chaos and ruin in that!

There is opposition in the Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland. Nelson Riis did not invent this. It’s there and will probably get stronger.

All the fear mongering by the pro-pipeline crowd, including Scotiabank, is not going to change that.

Lose Canada’s competitive edge because some ‘loser’ pipeline doesn’t get built? Now I’ve heard everything.

Dennis Peacock

Clearwater, B.C.