If you think it’s broken, help fix it

Local governments provide communities with essential infrastructure

Wendy Coomber

If you’re the type of person who counts living in this fine country as one of their blessings, then you already know that we enjoy many aspects of life that people in other countries can’t even dream of.

Add local elections to that. Yes, be thankful that we are able to hold peaceful elections and choose a politician to represent us.

Thousands of people – perhaps millions – would, and have, fight to have that privilege. At one time, segments of our own population struggled against the powers that were, at great risk to themselves, to be able to vote.

Because they knew that without a vote, they had no voice. They could not support a candidate, they could not influence decision-making.

It’s appalling to see how indifferent we’ve become to elections. How skeptical we view the entire process and use that to justify ignoring the entire thing. The view is that it’s broken, it doesn’t work and who cares?

It might be enlightening to transport these folks to a country where elections either don’t take place, or their outcomes are determined before the ballots are even printed.

Local government includes not only municipal governments – like Ashcroft, Cache Creek or Clinton Council, but also school boards and the trustees who are elected to them, and regional district directors such as the ones who sit around the board table at the TNRD.

Local governments provide communities with essential infrastructure, including streets, sidewalks, water, schools, public safety and recreation. In 2012, B.C.’s local governments spent about $8.1 billion, helping to support economic growth, create jobs, stimulate investment, attract people and sustain a high quality of life.

Living in our small towns means that most of us know at least one elected official. Take the time, next time you see them, to ask them what they do as a councillor or a trustee. And then plan to vote on Nov. 15.

– Wendy Coomber is editor of the Ashcroft-Cache Creek Journal

 

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Vavenby resident working at refuge witnesses volcano eruption

By Robyn Rexin Twenty-seven-year-old Vavenby resident Vienna Moilliet is working as a… Continue reading

Back in time

55 YEARS AGO: A toboggan party was enjoyed by the Teen Town… Continue reading

Clearwater’s North Thompson Complex packed with Winterfest fun

By K.A. Pendergrast Friday, Jan.17 helped kick off the Clearwater Hockey Days/Winterfest… Continue reading

Literacy Week coming to Clearwater with lots of reading-related events

Clearwater will be celebrating Family Literacy Week (Jan. 26 to Feb. 2)… Continue reading

Don’t be surprised to see Vikings in Wells Gray

The Vikings are coming to Clearwater. On Feb. 1, the Wells Gray… Continue reading

‘Presumptive case’ of coronavirus in Canada confirmed by Ontario doctors

Man in his 50s felt ill on his return to Canada from Wuhan, China

People knowingly take fentanyl so make policy changes to reduce harm: B.C. study

Dr. Jane Buxton, an epidemiologist at the centre, says drug users need more resources,

‘My heart is going to bleed’: Bodies brought back to Canada following Iran plane crash

Remains of Sahar Haghjoo, 37, and her eight-year-old daughter, Elsa Jadidi, were identified last weekend

UBC grad and sister killed in Iran plane crash had bright futures ahead, close friend says

Asadi-Lari siblings Mohammad Hussein and Zeynab were two of 57 Canadians aboard downed Flight PS752

BCLC opens novelty bet on Harry and Meghan moving to the west coast

Meanwhile, real estate agency points to four possible homes for the family

Coastal GasLink work camp in Vanderhoof gets approved by the ALC

The work camp behind the Vanderhoof airport was first rejected by the commission in October last year

Canada slips in global corruption ranking in aftermath of SNC-Lavalin scandal

The country obtained a score of 77, which places it at the top in the Americas

Wuhan bans cars, Hong Kong closes schools as coronavirus spreads

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam said her government will raise its response level to emergency, highest one

Most Read