Hello pipeline, good-bye orcas

The 82 members of J-pod, that will be sacrificed once oil starts to flow in Kinder Morgan's new pipeline

Editor, The Times:

It’s hard to share water with a super tanker, and even harder when there’s a 600 per cent increase in tanker traffic. Something has to give.

In the case of the B.C. Coast, it is B.C.’s iconic and already endangered killer whale, the 82 members of J-pod, that will be sacrificed once oil starts to flow in Kinder Morgan’s new pipeline.

Orcas, or killer whales, depend on sound to communicate with their pods and the disruption in underwater acoustics will go a long way toward decimating them. Collisions with boats longer than three football fields and their multi-bladed propellors won’t help either. This situation has been accepted in numerous studies and by the National Energy Board. Good bye, orcas.

The orcas won’t be getting any benefit from Kinder Morgan’s new pipeline, nor will the people of B.C. Despite the vastly overstated job numbers, the company figures point to just 50 jobs in B.C.

And how about tax revenue? Over the past five years, Kinder has paid an average of only $1.5 M per year and, in two of those years, it got rebates. K-M Canada is a subsidiary of the U.S. firm and it is structured with an eye to tax avoidance. In fact, given other subsidies, such as low electricity rates, K-M’s project will cost Canadians money. Ironically, the oil isn’t for Canadians, either. There are no benefits .

If the orcas are in big trouble, K-M’s investors won’t be let off the hook either. K-M has been borrowing money to pay dividends and it only stopped issuing dividends when the bankers refused to lend it any more.

Once this got out, in the last half of 2015, K-M’s share price plunged 50 per cent to where it now sits. One of the main problems is that low oil prices have indebted many oil and gas producers, K–M’s customers, and some of them are filing for bankruptcy. This impacts K-M’s cash flow. Also, K-M is said to be overextended with new projects that cost money but that aren’t giving any returns.

If the path of K-M’s new pipeline is littered with losers, not just the orcas, there could still be some winners. The reader may be interested in researching the Enron/Kinder Morgan connection.

Dave Simms

Clearwater, B.C.

 

 

Just Posted

VIDEO: Researchers rely on drones to survey aftermath of B.C. wildfires

UBC researchers are using aerial drones to study the historic 2017 wildfires in the province

Report gives details on proposal to relocate Grade 7s

According to the report, there has been some interest generated in the communities to relocate

This weekend at the Sportsplex

Here is the schedule for the North Thompson Sportsplex for the weekend of Dec. 15 – 17

Province rejects Ajax mine in Kamloops

KGHM Ajax had proposed a 1,700-hectare open-pit copper and gold mine, just southwest of Kamloops

Thompson Rivers University students — by the numbers

Thompson Rivers University enrolment has increased during this school term compared to 2016

VIDEO: Average Canadian food bill to rise by $348 in 2018

Atlantic Canada and B.C. will see the most increases for consumers

‘The Last Jedi’ opens with $220M, 2nd best weekend all-time

As anticipated, the movie fell shy of the opening weekend for J.J. Abrams’ 2015 franchise reboot

2 couples tie the knot in Australia’s 1st same-sex weddings

West Australian couple Anne Sedgwick, Lyn Hawkins have been together for 40 years

B.C. concert promoter bans Nazi symbols at shows

A man was witnessed making a Nazi salute during a heavy metal show at Pub 340

EDITORIAL: Putting #MeToo to work in your workplace

Workers from top to bottom need to stand together against the bully of sexual harassment

Owl found dead after eating rat poison leaves B.C. woman concerned

After finding the owl on her Surrey property, Christine Trozzo says the poison is a concern for kids

Change to CPP death benefit panned as insufficient to cover funeral costs

Funeral Services Association of Canada lobbied governments to raise the value to $3,580

#MeToo at work: Employers play a role in fixing culture of sexual harassment

B.C. workplaces are getting ahead of being the next MeToo debacle, calling on experts to train staff

B.C. woman brain injured in crash as a baby gets $1.1 million in damages

Trial heard the woman was 16 months old, being carried by her mother when they were both hit

Most Read