Hello pipeline, good-bye orcas

The 82 members of J-pod, that will be sacrificed once oil starts to flow in Kinder Morgan's new pipeline

Editor, The Times:

It’s hard to share water with a super tanker, and even harder when there’s a 600 per cent increase in tanker traffic. Something has to give.

In the case of the B.C. Coast, it is B.C.’s iconic and already endangered killer whale, the 82 members of J-pod, that will be sacrificed once oil starts to flow in Kinder Morgan’s new pipeline.

Orcas, or killer whales, depend on sound to communicate with their pods and the disruption in underwater acoustics will go a long way toward decimating them. Collisions with boats longer than three football fields and their multi-bladed propellors won’t help either. This situation has been accepted in numerous studies and by the National Energy Board. Good bye, orcas.

The orcas won’t be getting any benefit from Kinder Morgan’s new pipeline, nor will the people of B.C. Despite the vastly overstated job numbers, the company figures point to just 50 jobs in B.C.

And how about tax revenue? Over the past five years, Kinder has paid an average of only $1.5 M per year and, in two of those years, it got rebates. K-M Canada is a subsidiary of the U.S. firm and it is structured with an eye to tax avoidance. In fact, given other subsidies, such as low electricity rates, K-M’s project will cost Canadians money. Ironically, the oil isn’t for Canadians, either. There are no benefits .

If the orcas are in big trouble, K-M’s investors won’t be let off the hook either. K-M has been borrowing money to pay dividends and it only stopped issuing dividends when the bankers refused to lend it any more.

Once this got out, in the last half of 2015, K-M’s share price plunged 50 per cent to where it now sits. One of the main problems is that low oil prices have indebted many oil and gas producers, K–M’s customers, and some of them are filing for bankruptcy. This impacts K-M’s cash flow. Also, K-M is said to be overextended with new projects that cost money but that aren’t giving any returns.

If the path of K-M’s new pipeline is littered with losers, not just the orcas, there could still be some winners. The reader may be interested in researching the Enron/Kinder Morgan connection.

Dave Simms

Clearwater, B.C.

 

 

Just Posted

Open burns now allowed in Kamloops Fire Centre

Anyone lighting an open fire still has to comply with B.C.’s air quality control laws

TLC completes fundraising campaign to protect Clearwater wildlife corridor

Land Trust protects additional 10 acres of migratory wildlife corridor

Sikh community loses longtime member, closes temple

Holy Scripture will now be moved to Kamloops

Back in Time

Historical Perspective

Feathery critters make homes in hydro poles

Nests inside can be as big as three soccer balls

VIDEO: Neighbours fear impact of B.C. tent city residents

Greater Victoria residents opposed to campers voice concerns at provincial campground

New evacuations ordered because of Florence flooding

Emergency managers on Friday ordered about 500 people to flee homes along the Lynches River

B.C. doctor weighs in on the kid ‘screen time’ debate

A Maple Ridge mother opens up about her children’s use of tablets, smartphones and television

B.C. councillor’s expenses being sent to the RCMP

Decision to have expenses audited and shared with RCMP taken at special meeting of council

More than 35 B.C. mayors elected without contest

No other candidates for mayor in the upcoming local election in 22 per cent of B.C. cities

Legal society poster seeks complainants against two cops on Downtown Eastside

Pivot Legal Society became aware of allegations made against the officers after a video circulated

Jury to deliberate in case of Calgary man accused of murdering woman

Curtis Healy could be convicted of first-degree murder, second-degree murder or manslaughter

House arrest for man who abused disabled B.C. woman, then blamed her

‘Groomed complainant’ and ‘violated position of trust,’ judge says

Most Read