Government, democracy stable for 150 years in Canada

I am not writing this letter to oppose or support changes to the Canadian electoral system, but to support the democracy of Canada

Editor The Times:

I am not writing this letter to oppose or support changes to the Canadian electoral system, but to support the democracy of Canada that has existed since 1867 and is widely seen as one of the best places on earth to live.

Canadians on average are well educated and responsible people. We have fewer bankruptcies and substantially lower violent crime rates than our U.S. counterparts.

We typically will acquiesce to another person’s point of view if the logic and outcomes of an argument are justified. We are a nation of hard workers, but have compassion for people with less means than ourselves.

We live in a democratic socialist state that ensures those who struggle are not left behind and those who earn substantially more share in the costs of government at a higher rate than the average worker. We fund these systems, for the most part willingly, when the alternatives of other global opportunities can be compelling.

Given this natural and justifiable propensity to be concerned and responsible citizens of this country, why would any government allow special-interest groups to have undue influence over the way we elect our leader?

In almost 150 years, our country has continued to have one of the most stable governments in the world. We are not generally looking at costly and divisive election campaigns every one or two years, as was the case with our recent minority governments that fell apart over sectarian interests.

I am not saying it is a perfect system, but I am saying Canadians deserve a choice.

We have come this far in a democratic and civilized fashion, so why change this to town

hall discussions favouring whoever can plant enough supporters with loud voices at a town hall forum?

A free vote on an issue that can have a profound effect on the way our country operates for the next 150 years allows all to express their views.

Change for change sake may be exciting, but as an old proverb states, “May you be fortunate enough to live in dull times.”

Scott Tupper, president

 

Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo Conservative Electoral District Association

 

 

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