Editor, The Times:

It has to end somewhere, but where?

Editor, The Times:

After the recent Rural Rights Association meeting I came home and went to bed early.

Of course, being the insomniac that I am I awoke at 2 a.m. I tuned the radio onto CBC overnight. The first voice was the raspy tones of Donald Trump announcing that he had cut some 3 million Americans off food stamps. Put ‘em back in the workforce, hee hee.

Well, at least two-thirds of these US citizens have jobs, many have more than one, up to three. The problem with lousy wages, high living expenses, etc…, there isn’t enough money to pay the rent, put the kids to school and keep up with the expenses in general.

Food stamps put food on the table.

Of course, Bonkers Trump wouldn’t know anything about that. He’s done his own super freeloading — four or was it six times bankrupt? Using daddy’s pocket to keep going in business. Stiffing his workers and suppliers, not once, but many times.

Just like the Wall Street “banksters” who 10 years ago collected trillions in bailout money from the American taxpayer. They bought themselves a new corporate jet and paid themselves huge bonuses.

Ah, that socialism, very good when it applies to the rich and the powerful. When it comes to those on food stamps — let em eat cake!

And to compound it all as my friend who monitors this thing closely, there are these comments on the net, mostly coming from some Calgarian or one of the people from Red Deer, Oh those three million Americans aren’t worth anything, but please give the Alberta oilpatch a great pile of cash to make up for the stupid mistakes we’ve made. Ah, but that’s another story altogether.

And why am I rambling on about Donald Trump and food stamps? Well, the attitude is very similar to those who would drive the dwellers of the fifth wheels and travel trailers into the wild snowy night. People like Regina Sadalkova and others.

It has to end somewhere, but where?

Dennis Peacock,

Clearwater, B.C.

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