At Strathcona Park, in Vancouver, an entire village of homeless campers still occupying 400 tents after over three months. Concerns have mounted about the spread of COVID-19 among hundreds of people living in tight quarters. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

At Strathcona Park, in Vancouver, an entire village of homeless campers still occupying 400 tents after over three months. Concerns have mounted about the spread of COVID-19 among hundreds of people living in tight quarters. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Who controls Vancouver’s Strathcona park? Police clash with tent city residents

Vancouver councillor says it’s clear the encampment is ‘under the leadership of criminal elements’

By Jen St. Denis, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

The Tyee

Two Vancouver city councillors say plans to remove a tent city in Strathcona Park should be accelerated following a series of events Tuesday when camp residents challenged the presence of police and local politicians in the park.

Coun. Pete Fry said it’s clear the camp has come to be “under the leadership of criminal elements,” while Coun. Rebecca Bligh said the incidents that happened this week have made it clear to her that “criminal activity” is happening in the park.

Camp organizer Chrissy Brett disputed that characterization, calling Fry’s comments a “stereotypical, ignorant view on homelessness.”

An estimated 200 to 400 residents having been living in the park at various times since June after a previous tent city in Oppenheimer Park, also supported by Brett, was closed in May.

But Fry denies he made the comments, and said he has only been at the Union Market once in the past month…

The city and park board have put in place a slow-moving plan to move people from the tent city — also known as Camp Kennedy Trudeau, or Camp KT — as spaces in shelters or housing become available. The goal is to relocate residents by April.

But Bligh said it’s become clear that gradual plan is no longer feasible.

RELATED: Young man assaulted, left for 12 hours until help called in Vancouver’s Strathcona Park

“We and our staff have worked incredibly hard to try and achieve the desired outcome, which was really to acknowledge the fact that we are in a housing crisis, that people need housing and that the most humane way to decamp Strathcona Park is to… find people housing and then humanely clear the park,” Bligh told The Tyee.

“But what is clear… is that there is more criminal activity happening in that park than there is legitimate homelessness. It’s time to clear the park.”

Just after midnight on Tuesday, police arrived at the tent city to execute a search warrant in connection with a violent home invasion that led to the death of 78-year-old Usha Singh who lived near Queen Elizabeth Park, about six kilometres from the camp.

Pascal Bouthilette, 41, has been charged with second-degree murder and Sandy Parisian, 47, with manslaughter. Police charge the two men dressed as police officers to get inside Usha Singh’s home.

Parisian was known to live at the tent city, said Steve Addison, a media liaison officer with the VPD, and was arrested near the park.

Addison said a large and “volatile” group of people interfered when police went to the tent city in the early hours of Tuesday morning to execute a search warrant in connection with the case.

“Approximately 50 people did encroach upon them and attempt to interfere in the work that they were doing,” Addison said during a press conference, adding the situation became so volatile that officers had to call in help from across the city.

Video posted to YouTube and Facebook show supporters of the camp alleging the police didn’t have a search warrant and pointed weapons at Indigenous youth and women. The video shows police officers holding rifles with the gun barrels pointed towards the ground.

At several points in the video, camp supporters tell police to leave because park land is on unceded Indigenous territory. One police officer responds that Strathcona Park is a public city park. At another point, when camp supporters demand to see the search warrant, the officer tells them he can only show the search warrant to the person being served with it for privacy reasons.

In the videos, the camp supporters are at times drumming and singing, and at other times yelling and swearing at police.

On Tuesday afternoon, three city councillors — Fry, Bligh and Lisa Dominato — went to the edge of the park to do an interview with a Global News journalist.

READ MORE: Specialist who treated rare disease among homeless wants doctors to be aware of signs

Fry and Bligh said they were confronted by several camp residents who asked them to leave the park, which is about two kilometres from the Downtown Eastside. The councillors said they were on the very edge of the park at the corner of Hawks Avenue and Prior Street, far from the tent city.

“A woman in a scooter asked what we were doing and told us to leave the park because it was on unceded territory,” said Fry, who lives in the neighbourhood. “We advised her that we were city councillors and it was a public park. She left and returned with the quote-unquote Warriors.”

Those people told the city councillors they had to leave, Fry said. The situation didn’t feel safe, so he and the other councillors left the park.

Parisian, the man charged with manslaughter, has previously called himself the “Mayor of Oppenheimer Park,” Fry said, indicating he held some sort of leadership position at the previous tent city. Fry said it appears that certain people associated with the tent city are controlling who can go into the park.

“What I saw yesterday was a level of lawlessness that enables other lawless people,” he said.

Brett has previously told The Tyee that camp leaders and residents do control who can live in the main tent city, and they reject anyone who has been violent towards other people. In the past few months, camp residents have erected small fences around their area of the park to demarcate “Camp Kennedy Trudeau” from others who have also set up tents in the large city park.

Fry pointed out that several other violent incidents have happened at both Strathcona Park and Oppenheimer Park, including a man who was beaten and left unattended at Strathcona Park for 12 hours during daylight hours. The man, Carl Sinclair, later lost his leg.

Brett said violent incidents also happen in single-room occupancy hotel buildings in Vancouver’s nearby Downtown Eastside, but those buildings don’t receive as much scrutiny as the homeless camp at the park.

But Fry said he doesn’t know of any SRO buildings where management actively interfere with police investigations.

“I think that we need to assert a little bit more control in this situation,” Fry said. “I don’t think it’s fair. It’s a challenging issue for the housed residents .125of Strathcona.375, but I think it’s also the unhoused residents who… deserve the same rights and freedoms and protections as anyone, and not to be sort of bullied by a gang.”

Brett said the comments Fry has been making to the media and in the Strathcona neighbourhood have been upsetting to people who have experienced homelessness.

“A veteran who suffers from severe PTSD and with plates and pins throughout his body and who was at my first tent city showed up here to visit,” Brett told The Tyee via text message. “He overheard Pete Fry at the Union .125Market.375 and he showed up in tears. He could not believe the crap Pete Fry was spouting.”

Brett said that she would have offered to invite Fry to “a talking circle and request his allyship rather than his stereotypical, ignorant view on .125the.375 homeless.”

Regarding the incident on Tuesday afternoon when city councillors were told to leave the park, Brett said she didn’t witness it.

“If they brought the same attitude VPD brought, I would probably refuse them past protocol stage,” she said. Protocol refers to an Indigenous practice the camp leaders have been requiring of all visitors which involves asking them to offer tobacco to a fire in a gesture of good intentions.

In 2008 and again in 2015, the B.C. Supreme Court struck down city bylaws — one in Victoria and the other in Abbotsford — that prohibited people from erecting shelters or sleeping in city parks. The rulings did allow municipalities to require people to pack up their tents each day.

Fry said he’d like to see a process similar to the measures Surrey used to clear the Whalley Strip in 2018, a portion of sidewalk where many homeless people lived and pitched tents. The city and province partnered to offer housing or shelter spots to people, but also made it clear that tenting would no longer be allowed on that site.

Oppenheimer Park was cleared in May after the province bought or leased several hotels and offered housing to people. As people moved out of the park, fencing was put up so no new tents could go in.

Ten months later, the park in the heart of Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside neighbourhood remains closed to the public.

Strathcona ParkVancouverVancouver police

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A dose of COVID-19 vaccine is prepared at a vaccination clinic in Montreal’s Olympic Stadium on Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
39 new cases of COVID-19 in Interior Health region

The total number of cases in the region since the pandemic began is now at 7,334

A rainbow shining on Kelowna General Hospital on May 12, 2020 International Nurses Day. (Steve Wensley - Prime Light Media)
New COVID cases trending down in Interior Health

24 new cases reported Thursday, Feb. 25, death at Kelowna General Hospital

From left: Councillor Lucy Taylor, Councillor Barry Banford, Councillor Bill Haring, Mayor Merlin Blackwell, Councillor Lynne Frizzle, Councillor Lyle Mckenzie and Councillor Shelley Sim. (District of Clearwater photo)
Council to consider raising taxes in 2021

The District of Clearwater council is considering a tax increase this year… Continue reading

A nurse performs a test on a patient at a drive-in COVID-19 clinic in Montreal, on Wednesday, October 21, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson)
30 new COVID-19 cases, five more deaths in Interior Health

This brings the total number of cases to 7,271 since testing began

FILE – A COVID-19 vaccine being prepared. (Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing)
B.C. seniors 80 years and older to get COVID vaccine details over next 2 weeks: Henry

Province is expanding vaccine workforce as officials ramp up age-based rollout

Dr. Bonnie Henry leaves the podium after talking about the next steps in B.C.’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan during a press conference at Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Friday, January 22, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
COVID: 589 new cases in B.C., and 7 new deaths

No new outbreaks being reported Feb. 26

Staff from the Marine Mammal Rescue Centre, passersby, RCMP and Nanaimo Fire Rescue carried a sick 300-kilogram steller sea lion up the steep bluff at Invermere Beach in north Nanaimo in an attempt to save the animal’s life Thursday. (Photo courtesy Marine Mammal Rescue Centre)
300-kilogram sea lion muscled up from B.C. beach in rescue attempt

Animal dies despite efforts of Nanaimo marine mammal rescue team, emergency personnel and bystanders

Gina Adams as she works on her latest piece titled ‘Undying Love’. (Submitted photo)
‘Toothless’ the kitty inspires B.C. wood carver to break out the chainsaw

Inspired by plight of a toothless cat, Gina Adams offers proceeds from her artwork to help animals

B.C. Finance Minister Selina Robinson presents bill to delay B.C.’s budget as late as April 30, and allow further spending before that, B.C. legislature, Dec. 8, 2020. (Hansard TV)
How big is B.C.’s COVID-19 deficit? We’ll find out April 20

More borrowing expected as pandemic enters second year

The first of 11 Dash 8 Q400 aircraft's have arrived in Abbotsford. Conair Group Inc. will soon transform them into firefighting airtankers. (Submitted)
Abbotsford’s Conair begins airtanker transformation

Aerial firefighting company creating Q400AT airtanker in advance of local forest fire season

The Canada Revenue Agency says there were 32 tax fraud convictions across the country between April 2019 and March 2020. (Pixabay)
Vancouver man sentenced to 29 months, fined $645K for tax evasion, forgery

Michael Sholz reportedly forged documents to support ineligible tax credits linked to homeownership

Then-Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson looks on as MLA Shirley Bond answers questions during a press conference at Legislature in Victoria. (Chad Hipolito / THE CANADIAN PRESS)
B.C. Liberal party to choose next leader in February 2022

Candidates have until Nov. 30 to declare whether they are running

After nearly 10 months of investigations, Mounties have made an arrest in the tripping of an elderly woman in Burnaby this past April. (RCMP handout)
VIDEO: Mounties charge suspect for tripping elderly woman near Metrotown in April

32-year-old Hayun Song is accused of causing bodily harm to an 84-year-old using her walker

British Columbia provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry arrives to view the Murals of Gratitude exhibition in Vancouver, on Friday, July 3, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Death threats mount against Dr. Bonnie Henry, sparking condemnation from Horgan, Dix

Henry has become a staple on televisions in homes across British Columbia since January 2020

Most Read