A pipeline protests gathered in Vancouver Sunday, June 9. (Protect the Inlet)

Trans Mountain pipeline protestors rally in Vancouver

Ottawa has until June 18 to decide on pipeline’s fate

Pipeline protestors gathered in Vancouver Sunday to rally against the Trans Mountain pipeline.

Ottawa is expected to decide on final approval for the Edmonton to Burnaby pipeline on June 18.

The decision was originally due on May 23 but the feds said delaying the decision would give them more time to consult Indigenous groups.

READ MORE: Oil companies, 24-cent gap between B.C., Alberta to be focus of gas price probe

READ MORE: Trans Mountain stake should go to Indigenous owners on route, B.C. chief says

On the streets of Vancouver, protestors were vehement the project not go ahead.

“Building the Trans Mountain pipeline and tanker project would trespass on fundamental Indigenous rights in Canada, fuel the climate emergency fire and risk our coastal waters. One major spill could doom our Southern Resident killer whales and the salmon so many depend on,” said Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs.

“Oil companies are making record profits and crying poverty. The economic case for this project collapsed with $120 a barrel crude oil prices. The boom is over and it’s not coming back – we must embrace a clean energy economy for our children and grandchildren, despite Justin Trudeau’s ongoing support to the dirty fossil fuel industry.”

The B.C. government has fought against the Trans mountain pipeline in court, but was dealt a blow in May after the B.C. Court of Appeal said the province’s attempt to create permits for companies that wished to increase their flow of diluted bitumen was unconstitutional.

READ MORE: Court says B.C. can’t restrict oil shipments in key case for Trans Mountain

READ MORE: More gasoline, less bitumen in Trans Mountain pipeline, B.C. premier urges Trudeau


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

COVID-19 highlights lack of connectivity in First Nations communities

Many don’t have access required to utilize online platforms, says First Nations Technology Council

Restaurants adjust to loosened restrictions

Gateway Grill in Clearwater is one of the establishments that’s reopened its doors to in-house guests

Going above and beyond the call of duty

“She does it out of the goodness of her heart … she loves seeing the results.”

Tourism Wells Gray looks at silver linings

Domestic tourism and pipeline workers may compensate for some of the lost tourism dollars this year

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

COVID-19: B.C. too dependent on foreign food production workers

New B.C. job site links unemployed with farm, seafood work

B.C. businesses ‘can’t shoulder burden’ of COVID-19 sick pay

Trudeau’s plan should be tied to federal emergency aid

Another Asian giant ‘murder hornet’ found in Lower Mainland

This is the farthest east the invasive species has been found so far

B.C. girl left temporarily paralyzed by tick bite sparks warning from family

Mom says parents need to check their kids when they go camping

PHOTOS: Loved ones reunite at an oasis on closed U.S.-Canada border in Surrey

Officials closed the park in mid-March over coronavirus concerns

Feds delay national action plan for missing and murdered Indigenous women

Meanwhile, the pandemic has exacerbated the violence facing many Indigenous women and girls

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

COLUMN: Canada needs to remember rural communities as thoughts turn to pandemic recovery

Small towns often rely on tourism, which has been decimated by COVID-19

Most Read