Thompson Rivers University cancels face-to-face classes this week

Thompson Rivers University cancels face-to-face classes this week

“These are unprecedented times at TRU, and for our society,” Fairbairn said

Thompson Rivers University is suspending face-to-face classes this week due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

From March 16-20, at both TRU’s Williams Lake and Kamloops campuses, along with regional centres, there will be no classes in session including lectures, seminars, labs, studios, field school and field trips.

“For students, the week of March 16 will be a study and catch-up week; for faculty, it will provide needed time to make arrangements for virtual or alternate forms of delivery of their courses, including final exams,” said TRU president and vice-chancellor Brett Fairbairn Sunday.

He said students’ instructors will connect with them directly as arrangements are made, and asked for patience during this time.

As of March 23, courses will resume for most programs in alternate formats.

“For trades, given the extensive shop time required for learning, more discussions are required,” Fairbairn said. “Students will be informed as soon as possible on how these programs will resume.”

Internships, placements and practica are not affected at this time, he said, and will continue as normally scheduled.

TRU Open learning is still operating with registration open for courses, however, some face-to-face labs may be affected and students will be noticed directly, he added.

READ MORE: Calls for TRU to enhance nursing program heard at Envision TRU consultation

“While TRU is moving away from face-to-face classes for the time being, our campuses and regional centres remain open,” he said.

Services such as libraries, student supports, administrative offices, and study areas will be open. There may, however, be some modification to hours, or how service is delivered to support the health and well-being of all members of our university community.

“These are unprecedented times at TRU, and for our society,” Fairbairn said. “The measures above are our way of helping to contain the spread of the coronavirus, while at the same time, supporting students in their continued studies.

“Looking ahead, TRU is planning for how courses will be delivered in our spring and summer semesters in light of of our current reality. I encourage you to visit the university’s website tru.ca/covid19, where we will post regular updates, including answers to your frequently asked questions.”


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