Rural Rights Association begins expansion

Rural Rights Association begins expansion

Membership drive nets roughly 50 card-carrying members for the group

The Rural Rights Association of B.C. (RRABC) held a meeting recently as a membership drive while also detailing its statement of purpose to the public.

The group, which formed about three months ago, was created after unclear bylaws involving the use of recreational vehicles on private property were being enforced by the Thompson-Nicola Regional District (TNRD).

“We were told by a regional bylaw officer that it was illegal to have anyone stay on your land, period, for any longer than two weeks, which we have since found out isn’t true. There is no such bylaw,” said Tom Coles, president of RRABC.

“The problem is RVs and people living in them are really just a symptom of a far greater problem and the problem is wages are stagnating, mills are shutting down and jobs are being lost.”

More specifically, Coles added the RRABC was formed so rural residents could drive home the point to government that it should seek a compassionate solution to the problem and help the residents who elected its officials, instead of punishing them for trying to deal with their housing issues.

A Merritt chapter also recently signed on, giving the group a regional director who will spearhead efforts in that part of the TNRD.

Coles then delivered the group’s statement of purpose, describing it as a citizens’ group dedicated to the belief that people have a right to self-determination to live a life of their choosing within their economic limitations.

“Rural people have increasingly less political representation within the decision-making process of regional and provincial governments who are imposing bylaws and regulations that severely restrict the peaceful occupation and enjoyment of their own properties,” said Coles.

“We’re seeing more urban style prohibitions and bylaws forced upon rural residents with little or no consultation from those we’ve elected and entrusted to be of service to us.

“They have allotted themselves power and authority over every aspect of our lives and as a result, many are feeling they’re not getting the representation they are entitled to as Canadians and British Columbians.”

The statement also noted the group isn’t aligned with any political party, and is a not-for-profit group with goals to lobby regional and provincial governments to rescind or revise bylaws that restrict freedoms of those within rural B.C. as deemed necessary by its members.

RRABC is committed to the peaceful resolution of conflict and to engage in mediation and dialogue between those levels of government that impact the lives of British Columbians, the statement said.

It’s dedicated to ensuring voices of rural peoples will be heard and that elected government representatives endeavor to fulfill the duties they were appointed to on behalf of all members of rural society, not just a select few, hence the motto: Respect our existence or expect our resistance.

Coles added the group doesn’t engage in matters of aboriginal rights or treaties, nor does it take sides or offer opinions on issues it doesn’t endorse, nor condemn the actions of any one political party.

“Our membership is committed to being completely non-partisan and is not limited to any one political view,” he said

“Our association is welcoming to anyone, rural or urban, regardless of race, gender, religion or political affiliation.”



newsroom@clearwatertimes.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Elvira D’Angelo, 92, waits to receive her COVID-19 vaccination shot at a clinic in Montreal, Sunday, March 7, 2021, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
110 new cases of COVID-19 in Interior Health

Provincial health officers announced 1,005 new cases throughout B.C.

File
TNRD to test emergency alert app

The Voyent Alert! emergency notification will be sent April 23.

Interior Health nurses administer Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines to seniors and care aids in Kelowna on Tuesday, March 16. (Phil McLachlan/Kelowna Capital News)
69 new cases of COVID-19 in Interior Health

The total number of cases in the region is now at 9,840 since the pandemic began

Kelowna General Hospital (File photo)
Interior Health hospitals not strained by rising COVID case counts

While provincial hospitalizations rise, health care systems in the B.C. Interior remain robust, say officials

An Interior Health nurse administers Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines to seniors and care aids in Kelowna on Tuesday, March 16, 2021. (Phil McLachlan/Kelowna Capital News)
105 new COVID-19 cases in Interior Health

Just over 8,000 new vaccine doses administered in the region for a total of 158,000 to date

Rainbow trouts thrashing with life as they’re about to be transferred to the largest lake of their lives, even though it’s pretty small. These rainbows have a blue tinge because they matched the blue of their hatchery pen, but soon they’ll take on the green-browns of their new home at Lookout Lake. (Zoe Ducklow/News Staff)
VIDEO: B.C. lake stocked with hatchery trout to delight of a seniors fishing club

The Cherish Trout Scouts made plans to come back fishing soon

Photos of Vancouver Canucks players are pictured outside the closed box office of Rogers Arena in downtown Vancouver Thursday, April 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Canucks games against Leafs postponed as team returns from COVID-19

The team has had 11 games postponed since an outbreak late last month

Vancouver Police Const. Deepak Sood is under review by the Independent Investigations Office of B.C. after making comments to a harm reduction advocate Sunday, April 11. (Screen grab)
VIDEO: Vancouver officer convicted of uttering threats under watchdog review again

Const. Deepak Sood was recorded Sunday saying ‘I’ll smack you’ and ‘go back to selling drugs’ to a harm reduction advocate

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry prepares a daily update on the coronavirus pandemic, April 21, 2020. (B.C. Government)
B.C.’s COVID-19 infection rate persists, 1,005 new cases Friday

Hospitalization up to 425, six more virus-related deaths

Premier John Horgan receives a dose of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine at the pharmacy in James Bay Thrifty’s Foods in Victoria, B.C., on Friday, April 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. Premier John Horgan gets AstraZeneca shot, encourages others

27% of residents in B.C. have now been vaccinated against COVID-19

The Nautical Dog Cafe at Skaha marina is getting its patio ready in hopes Mother Nature will provide where provincial restrictions have taken away indoor dining. (Facebook)
‘A lot of instability’: B.C. restaurants in layoff limbo

As COVID-19 cases stay high, restaurants in British Columbia are closed to indoor dining

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau looks on as Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland responds to a question during a news conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Expectations high as Trudeau Liberals get ready to unveil first pandemic budget

The Liberals will look to thread an economic needle with Monday’s budget

Coldstream students took over the Your Letters page in the April 9, 2021, edition of the Vernon Morning Star to offer advice to adults about COVID-19. Interior Health took notice and offered their praise. (Vernon Morning Star)
‘We can get rid of COVID together’: B.C. kids share heartwarming advice

Grade 2 and 3 classes from a North Okanagan elementary took over Letters page of this Black Press newspaper

Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops. (Dave Eagles/Kamloops This Week file photo)
RCMP intercept vehicle fleeing with infant taken from Kamloops hospital

The baby was at the hospital receiving life-saving care

Most Read