Marc Simpson of Blackpool Fire Rescue works at disabling a car’s electricity during extrication training put on by Clearwater and District Road Rescue, which took place on Nov. 8. Photo by Jaime Polmateer

Marc Simpson of Blackpool Fire Rescue works at disabling a car’s electricity during extrication training put on by Clearwater and District Road Rescue, which took place on Nov. 8. Photo by Jaime Polmateer

Road rescue holds fall extrication training

Candidate practice skills needed to help those on the road

Clearwater and District Road Rescue held its fall training for auto extrication on the weekend where 23 candidates from Blackpool, Vavenby, Clearwater and Little Fort practiced skills needed to help those on the road.

On Nov. 8 participants took part in eight scenarios where they had to gain access into wrecked vehicles and safely remove mock patients who were inside.

“Each of the teams got to work with different members from different units and then work their way through a scenario,” said Mike Savage, instructor for the training.

“It helps to refine the skill sets some of the folks have, introduces new techniques, shows how to overcome obstacles, like with some of the vehicles that have new and enhanced high steel densities, which are harder to cut, and how to do that with some of the older tools.”

Province reviewing road rescue system

The training also gives newer members the chance to learn how to safely enter, assess, manage and extricate someone from a vehicle from start to finish.

There was a representative on hand from Rocky Mountain Phoenix, a supplier of fire and rescue equipment, who had the new generation of battery-powered e-tools for highway rescue members to try out.

This was the first time members got to work with the new generation tools, in scenarios where they started with the current hydraulic models before getting hands-on experience with the battery-operated equivalents.

“These events are made possible by the continued support and time by Clearwater Towing — Nelson Hindle and his staff — who provide us with wrecked and disabled vehicles we can cut up and a site that makes it easy for all involved to attend and use,” said savage.

Savage noted highway rescue has responded to a little more than 30 calls this year, which he said was an average amount, though now that the winter months are here, the volume could increase significantly.



newsroom@clearwatertimes.com

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