Pygmalion play provides witty entertainment

After Hours Theatre is presenting an adapted version of Pygmalion, by the Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw, starting Mar. 1 at CSS

Shay  Pearson (as Professor Hetti Higgins) shows Neal Broswick (as Elijah Doolittle) her notes she used to transcribe his accent. They were taking part in After Hours Theatre’s production of Pygmalion. A three-day performance run begins in the Pit at Clearwater Secondary School on Mar. 1.

Shay Pearson (as Professor Hetti Higgins) shows Neal Broswick (as Elijah Doolittle) her notes she used to transcribe his accent. They were taking part in After Hours Theatre’s production of Pygmalion. A three-day performance run begins in the Pit at Clearwater Secondary School on Mar. 1.

After Hours Theatre is presenting an adapted version of Pygmalion, by the Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw. Pygmalion, is a witty study of phonetics, a romantic comedy and a social commentary.

To bring a contemporary and local flavour to this familiar play, the original 1912 play has been work-shopped by the theatre company under the direction of Krystle Moilliett. I was taken aback by the many clever twists and turns in this adapted play. Just when I expected to hear familiar lines from the movie version, My Fair Lady, the actors would surprise me with references to local place names. My attention was held by this technique and I laughed often at the actor’s accents and their interactions with each other. There was no rain in Spain in this play but there was a weather report that included Tofino.

Positive energy flowed between the actors whose gestures and tones of voice matched the action. The opening scene depicted a group of people caught in the rain. The variety of interactions were well paced and humorous as immediately contemporary themes of gender reversals and age gaps were played out. The thick cockney accent mingled with other milder accents was effective and I was convinced I was in a city with many different folks. Costumes for the most part were simple. In the final scene the leading man looks stunning in his tuxedo.

Audience members will find themselves sitting in an unconventional fashion as the stage takes on a non-traditional shape. Spot lighting of three separate areas focuses the audience’s attention as the scenes change.

I highly recommend you come to see Pygmalion with an open mind and be prepared to experience an evening of high quality entertainment.

 

The play opens on Thursday, March 1, and will run for three days. Tickets can be purchased at the Community Resource Center.

– Sandra Holmes