The Mayan Madness dinner theatre, co-sponsored by Hope of the Pokomchi and Clearwater Theatre Collective, was considered a great success by organizers, raising more than $4,000 that will go toward helping the Pokomchi people of Guatemala.                                 Photo submitted

The Mayan Madness dinner theatre, co-sponsored by Hope of the Pokomchi and Clearwater Theatre Collective, was considered a great success by organizers, raising more than $4,000 that will go toward helping the Pokomchi people of Guatemala. Photo submitted

Mayan Madness dinner theatre a success

Along with raising funds to help the Pokomchi, the event also helped bring community together

By Jaime Polmateer

Last month’s Mayan Madness dinner theatre was deemed a “huge success” by organizers, raising more than $4,000 that will go toward helping the Pokomchi people of Guatemala.

Linda Brierly, who was part of the organizing committee for the event said the evening went off without a hitch, and along with raising funds to help the indigenous group in Central America, the event also helped bring the Clearwater community together.

“The fact we raised the funds we did to help the Pokomchi and the ministry (was great), but I think equally gratifying was how there was such a cross section of the community represented in the audience and the networking and relationships that went on to bring it all to pass was very positive and rewarding,” she said.

The murder mystery event was co-sponsored by the Clearwater Theatre Collective and the money raised from the night will go toward educational efforts and infrastructure to help the Pokomchi people.

The Pokomchi are one of 21 Mayan Indigenous groups in Guatemala directly descended from the ancient Mayan culture.

Some of the efforts the evening will support are an educational centre in Guatemala that hosts seminars and training courses for Pokomchi peoples of various walks of life like children, midwives, nurses and pastors.

Infrastructure projects that will benefit from the funds include replacing open fire places in huts with stoves and building water tanks so villagers don’t have to walk as far to get water, as well as building sanitary outhouses.