B.C. Supreme Court in Greater Victoria. (Black Press Media file photo)

Jury selection in B.C. Supreme Court postponed over coronavirus concerns

Meanwhile, provincial court remains open but a contingency plan is in place

Courts in B.C. are taking sweeping precautions amid the COVID-19 spread, including postponing jury-trials and encouraging appeal matters to also be adjourned, effective immediately.

In a statement issued Friday, the B.C. Supreme Court announced it would be cancelling jury selections until the end of May across the province. This means that those accused in criminal cases are being told to either make arrangements for a trial by judge alone or be forced to wait until after May 31.

Affected civil cases can also proceed without a jury.

As for ongoing jury trials, the presiding judge has been directed to consider whether the trial should continue or be adjourned until June.

WATCH: Six handwashing mistakes to avoid

Any appeals that are not urgently needing to proceed should also adjourn, the statement reads.

B.C.’s provincial courts remain open as of Friday, but officials have created a contingency plan to deal with COVID-19.

“Because the situation regarding COVID-19 is fluid, we will continue monitoring and assessing information as it becomes available,” a statement posted online reads. “Should any changes in court operations be necessary, we will post the details as soon as possible.”

Anyone placed on self-isolation is being asked to contact the court. Those with COVID-19 symptoms, including the public, are being asked to stay away from courtrooms.

More to come.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Back in Time

Historical Perspective

High water and flooding hits Clearwater

Potential for roadblock on Clearwater Valley Road due to potential washouts

Tk’emlups, Simpcw First Nations chiefs call on Tiny House Warriors to leave Blue River protest camp

“The Tiny House Warriors are not from Simpcw, nor are they our guests in our territory.”

TOTA recognized as Safe Travel Destination

Announcement confirms successful effort by communities to follow new health guidelines

PHOTO: Wells Gray Riders Association holds Canada Day parade

Riders don’t let the rainy morning dampen their spirits

B.C. accommodators need phone lines to light up as in-province travel given green light

Travel restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic have decimated the tourism and hospitality industries

300 Cache Creek residents on evacuation alert due to flood risk as river rises

Heavy rainfall on Canada Day has river rising steadily, threatening 175 properties

First glimpse of Canada’s true COVID-19 infection rate expected mid-July

At least 105,000 Canadians have tested positive for COVID-19 since the coronavirus was identified

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Most Read