A man hops in the water of a flooded street to get to a house on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Sainte-Marie Que. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jacques Boissinot)

Hundreds of Canadian troops deployed to flood zones in Quebec and N.B.

Officials say water levels are expected to rise in many regions

Quebec Premier Francois Legault will visit flood-damaged regions north of Montreal today, as warm temperatures and rising water levels threaten to worsen the spring flooding already wreaking havoc across a wide region.

Legault will visit a community centre and flooded homes on an island in the Laval region, where Canadian Forces troops are expected to join the efforts to limit the damage. The city says it could receive another 20 to 40 millimetres of rain in the coming days.

READ MORE: Quebec officials urge caution after flood-caused sinkhole claims woman’s life

Many people across Quebec and New Brunswick have been filling sandbags in an effort to protect their homes. Officials say water levels are expected to rise in many regions due to warming temperatures that contribute to snowmelt and ice movement.

About 200 soldiers started filling sandbags and carrying out evacuations in Quebec’s Outaouais and Mauricie regions overnight, with an additional 400 troops standing ready to deploy there and in Laval on Sunday.

Urgence Quebec says that as of Sunday morning, 980 residences across the province had been flooded and more than 1,200 people had left their homes.

Several major floods have been identified as threatening thousands of Quebecers, and so far one death has been blamed on the high water.

Police say 72-year-old Louise Seguin Lortie died Saturday morning after driving her car into a sinkhole caused by flooding in the Pontiac area, about 30 kilometres northwest of Ottawa.

Some of the worst flooding has been in the Beauce region south of Quebec City, where 883 homes were swamped and 765 people evacuated, up from 94 on Saturday.

Quebec’s public safety minister has urged citizens in affected areas to avoid unnecessary risks and to leave their homes if necessary.

Meanwhile, about 120 Canadian soldiers are being deployed across western New Brunswick to help residents threatened by rising floodwaters.

Fifteen communities in that province have been warned to remain on high alert.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Strawberry Tea — a delightful afternoon of fun

Students fundraise for European trip next spring

The Valley Tourist checks out IWE Rafting and The Clearwater Stop with gift shop

Looking into anything and everything that brings fun, enjoyment, and adventure

“To finish is to win” mantra of Barriere 50 mile endurance ride

‘No Bitch’in Barriere Ride-Just Ride’ came off for both horses and riders without a hitch

Back in Time

Historical Perspective

Cottonwood trees pose threat to motorists

Government has program to remove danger trees, but sometimes the responsibility is the landowner’s

VIDEO: Reports say Lashana Lynch is the new 007

Daniel Craig will reprise his role as Bond one last time

Worried about bats? Here’s what to do if you come across one in B.C.

Bat expert with the BC Community Bat Program urges caution around the small creatures

B.C. on right road with tougher ride-hailing driver rules, says expert

The provincial government is holding firm that ride-hailing drivers have a Class 4 licence

RCMP investigating alleged ‘sexual misconduct’ by cyclist on BCIT campus

BCIT said they were reviewing video evidence of the incident

New home cost dips in B.C.’s large urban centres

Victoria, Kelowna, Vancouver prices decline from last year

Graphic suicide scene edited out of ‘13 Reasons Why’ finale

Suicide prevention groups support the decision

Nine kittens and cats rescued after being locked in bins in northern B.C.: SPCA

SPCA says cats were starving, and matted with feces and urine

High-speed rail link would run from Vancouver to Seattle in under 1 hour: study

Annual ridership is projected to exceed three million

ICBC insurance renewals get more complicated this year

Crash history, driver risk prompt more reporting requirements

Most Read