High dollars equal high tech research at TRU

Funding from Ottawa has allowed Thompson Rivers University to purchase a high-tech piece of equipment to be used in scientific research

  • Aug. 13, 2011 3:00 p.m.
Don Noakes

Don Noakes

Funding from Ottawa has allowed Thompson Rivers University to purchase a high-tech piece of equipment to be used in scientific research.

Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo Conservative MP Cathy McLeod was on hand on Wednesday, Aug. 10, outside the Science Building at TRU to unveil the university’s acquisition of bioproduct equipment.

The purchase was made possible thanks to $890,000 in funding from the federal government’s Western Diversification (WED) Program.

“It’s huge,” McLeod said of the acquisition, which includes a low-temperature incubating facility, a complex mass spectrometer and meat research and development equipment.

“It’s very significant pieces of equipment,” she said.

“But, what it’s going to allow the different departments to do is amazing.”

Tom Dickinson, TRU’s dean of science, said the equipment will drastically increase the research potential of the university.

“The new analytical tools enabled by WED have expanded the capacity and potential of TRU and our region for discovery and innovation,” he said.

“Just as importantly, we are now able to broaden the opportunities for our students to do applied research that leads to immediate and direct outcomes.”

Dickinson was quick to credit Ottawa for its help.

“It’s just the latest in a string of investments that TRU has received from the federal government,” he said.

“The university has benefited tremendously.”

Dickinson said the equipment will allow researchers to do things such as detect a single molecule in a cube of water.

He said the applications are varied, from detecting contaminants in drinking water to examining hospitals for infections.

McLeod said the investment will be positive for the entire community.

“Supporting organizations like Thompson Rivers University in innovation and applied research is vital to the success of a knowledge-based economy,” she said.

 

“Today’s investment in equipment will benefit not only the university, but Kamloops and British Columbia and a whole.”

– Kamloops This Week