This Nov. 20, 2018 file photo shows romaine lettuce in Simi Valley, Calif. Canadian health officials are warning consumers to avoid romaine lettuce grown in Salinas, Calif., because of another food poisoning outbreak.THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Mark J. Terrill, File

Second warning on romaine lettuce from California region as another E. coli case reported

Two cases of E. coli have been reported in relation to the illness in the U.S.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is investigating a second case of E. coli linked to romaine lettuce from the U.S.

Authorities are now looking at two cases, one in Alberta and one in Manitoba, the agency said Friday. The individuals got sick in mid-October and early November. One was admitted to hospital.

The cases are genetically linked to U.S. outbreaks in 2017 and 2018 that stemmed from romaine lettuce, suggesting there may be a recurring source of contamination.

The U.S. Center for Disease Control continues to report multiple cases of E. coli connected to romaine in several states.

Romaine lettuce was imported from the U.S. until Nov. 22. In light of the second case, Canadian officials have brought in new measures to ensure that any affected romaine from Salinas, Calif. is no longer coming in.

The agency continues to advise people to not eat, and retailers and restaurants to not sell or serve, any romaine lettuce harvested from the Salinas region.

READ MORE: ‘The more you test, the more you find’: Beef recalls a sign of success, experts say

Romaine lettuce harvested in Canada is not affected.

This is the fourth E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce affecting Canadians in the last two years.


newsroom@100milefreepress.net

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