District plans installation of UV disinfection system

District of Clearwater is undertaking a number of initiatives in regards to its water supply

District of Clearwater is undertaking a number of initiatives in regards to its water supply.

That’s according to information distributed during a meeting held June 21 to discuss the municipality’s annual report.

The major project is a $385,000 investment to install an ultraviolet disinfection system to the Russell Creek source. The project design is complete and construction should be done by this fall.

Major funding for the project is coming from a Towns for Tomorrow grant.

The UV treatment should give improved health and safety plus help meet the requirements of the BC Drinking Water Protection Act.

Presently the municipality only makes use of chlorination at its gravity-fed intake at Russell Creek and at its two wells.

Also ongoing is a infrastructure master plan, budgeted to cost $140,000. This will be an overall plan for Clearwater’s infrastructure, including water, sewer, drainage, buildings and facilities, as well as roads and other transportation infrastructure.

A public open house will be held in the fall for this project.

Expected outcomes include cost savings, environmental benefits, improved health and safety, plus helping to meet drinking water regulations.

A water conservation plan is to be finalized this month. The plan is intended to reduce water use, defer infrastructure expansions and contribute to long-term sustainability. Major funding for the $15,000 project is coming through a Towns for Tomorrow grant.

The water conservation plan should save the town money, save water, and benefit the environment.

An emergency response plan for the water system has been completed. It will provide a proactive responses to emergency situations related to the water system, such a forest fire in the watershed or pump failure. The $10,000 investment is expected to result in cost savings, environmental benefits, and improved health and safety, plus help meet Interior Health’s conditions of permit.

An operation and maintenance plan is providing an organized and systematic tool to plan for routine functions and regular maintenance activities.

Expected outcomes from the $15,000 investment include cost savings, water savings, improved health and safety, as well as better compliance with Interior Health conditions of permit and Municipal Insurance Association recommendations.

A water quality-monitoring program also is now complete. It ensures that the correct parameters are being monitored at the appropriate frequency. Cost is $12,000 per year and it should result in improved health and safety, better compliance with Interior Health conditions and BC Drinking Water Protection Act.

The first phases of a leak detection program will assess how much leakage the system has and identify next steps. Losses in water systems can account for up to 20 per cent of all community water use. Despite having a wetter climate, Clearwater uses considerably more water than Kamloops on a per capita basis. Leaks might be one reason why.

The $10,000 invested in the leak detection program is expected to result in cost savings, water savings, environmental benefits plus improved health and safety.

 

Finally, $25,000 is being invested in SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) upgrades. The project will result in better system monitoring alarms, data acquisition and control. This should give improved health and safety, better compliance with Interior Health conditions of permit, plus help meet Municipal Insurance Association recommendations.