Canadian Pacific Railway locomotives are shuffled around a marshalling yard in Calgary. Canadian Press Photo

CP Rail must pay $31,500 for environmental pollution in Golden

CP Rail received the penalty due to failure to comply with an effluent discharge permit

Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd. has received a $31,500 penalty for environmental pollution by the Province of B.C.

The penalty CP Rail received was due to failure to comply with an effluent discharge permit for its railyard in Golden. As a result, CP is working to make some changes to its operations to ensure the issue is resolved.

“CP has taken a number of steps to correct the issue identified… including engineered upgrades to the treatment system and the hiring of a full-time treatment plant operator,” said CP Rail media relations advisor Salem Woodrow.

The company was unable to disclose what is being discharged from the rail yard, and where it is being discharged to.

A quarterly environmental assessment summary stated that CP Rail failed to comply with the terms of a waste discharge permit, which required the company to ensure that wastewater discharged from a pair of treatment plants met standards for biochemical oxygen demand, pH levels, and toxicity.

The provincial Natural Resource Compliance and Enforcement Database releases the quarterly reports. CP Rail was penalized in the third quarter of 2018.

The quarterly enforcement summaries detail a total of 1,728 actions taken by the provincial government during the third and fourth quarters, along with $885,907 in penalties and fines.

In total, the province stated it has issued 62 orders, 139 administrative sanctions, 31 court convictions, 14 administrative penalties and 2,412 violation tickets totalling $1,092,465 in fines in 2018.

The most frequently contravened acts were the Wildlife Act with 1,040 violations, the Fisheries Act (Canada) with 375 violations, and the Off-Road Vehicle Act with 344 violations, a provincial information bulletin states.

To date, nearly 33,000 enforcement actions have been published in the summary and entered into the ministry’s environmental violations database.

Other notable enforcement actions, for the third and fourth quarters, according to the province include:

* Radium Resort Group Ltd. was fined $200,000 for introducing waste-causing pollution and open burning of prohibited construction materials. Of that total, $190,000 was directed to Habitat Conservation Trust Fund.

* Mackenzie Pulp Mill Corporation (Mackenzie, B.C.) received penalties of $81,100 for failure to maintain a recovery boiler and failing to comply with permit limits for bivalent sulphur compounds and particulate matter.

* Savage Creek Golf Course Ltd. (near Richmond, B.C.) received a penalty of $70,000 for significantly exceeding fill-level maximums, while developing an 18-hole Richmond golf course expansion in the Agricultural Land Reserve.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

COVID-19 highlights lack of connectivity in First Nations communities

Many don’t have access required to utilize online platforms, says First Nations Technology Council

BC SPCA team helps discover new feline virus after outbreak at Quesnel shelter

Fechavirus is a kind of parvovirus, which makes cats and kittens very sick

Restaurants adjust to loosened restrictions

Gateway Grill in Clearwater is one of the establishments that’s reopened its doors to in-house guests

Going above and beyond the call of duty

“She does it out of the goodness of her heart … she loves seeing the results.”

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

Spirit bear possibly spotted in West Kootenay

A local resident spotted the white-coloured bear while on an evening trail run near Castlegar on May 27

B.C. businesses ‘can’t shoulder burden’ of COVID-19 sick pay

Trudeau’s plan should be tied to federal emergency aid

B.C. teacher reprimanded for sharing homophobic and sexist memes, making racist comments

Klaus Hardy Breslauer was accused of making a laundry list of concerning decisions as a science teacher

COVID-19: B.C. too dependent on foreign food production workers

New B.C. job site links unemployed with farm, seafood work

Another Asian giant ‘murder hornet’ found in Lower Mainland

This is the farthest east the invasive species has been found so far

B.C. girl left temporarily paralyzed by tick bite sparks warning from family

Mom says parents need to check their kids when they go camping

PHOTOS: Loved ones reunite at an oasis on closed U.S.-Canada border in Surrey

Officials closed the park in mid-March over coronavirus concerns

Feds delay national action plan for missing and murdered Indigenous women

Meanwhile, the pandemic has exacerbated the violence facing many Indigenous women and girls

Most Read