Coastal GasLink stops work on section of pipeline route

Internal audit reveals clearing took place without valid archaeological impact assessments in place

Map of pipeline route showing location of Section 8 on which work has been stopped due to discrepencies with archaeological impact assessments. Coastal GasLink graphic.

Coastal GasLink (CGL) has stopped work on the last section of its pipeline project which runs from roughly south of Hazelton to Kitimat due to discrepencies with its archaelogical impact assessments.

In a statement on its website tonight, the company said it had discovered during an internal audit two areas where clearing has taken place in Section 8 contrary to its permits from the BC Oil and Gas Commission (OGC).

“At KP (kilometre post) 585, an area of approximately 600 metres long by 50 metres wide was cleared without an approved AIA in place,” the statement reads. “Areas adjacent to this location did have an approved AIA and were identified as low likelihood of archaeological significance. While clearing activities have taken place, minimal ground disturbance has occurred since the area has been used for transit and corduroy mats had been placed to limit disturbance.

READ MORE: NEB rejects federal review of Coastal GasLink pipeline

“At KP 631, due to a re-route, an area of approximately 240 metres by 10 metres was cleared without an AIA being completed. Areas adjacent to this location did have an approved AIA and were identified as low likelihood of archaeological significance”

CGL says it has voluntarily disclosed these incidents to (OGC), and the Environmental Assessment Office (EAO) and First Nations groups affected.

“Coastal GasLink is committed to protecting the environmental and cultural values of British Columbia during construction and operation of our natural gas pipeline,” said David Pfieffer, CGL president.

READ MORE: Gidimt’en launch civil lawsuit against Coastal GasLink

“Coastal GasLink regrets the errors that led to construction activities taking place without having approved archaeological impact assessments in place prior to start of construction.

“I have directed the team to complete a thorough investigation of these incidents and have halted clearing work in the area until the investigation is complete and recommendations are put into practice.

“I have also apologized to the impacted Indigenous communities and requested their participation in a proposed post-impact assessment.”



editor@interior-news.com

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