Contributed file photo of B.C. Grand Chief Stewart Phillip.

Chiefs join anti-pipeline protests in Burnaby

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip says he believes it’s his responsibility to help stop the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion

The leader of the Union of British Columbia Indians Chiefs says he’ll keep coming back to the site of anti-pipeline protests in Burnaby until he gets arrested.

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip sat with a coffee cup in his hands between fellow union executive members, Chief Judy Wilson and Chief Bob Chamberlin, at the gates of Kinder Morgan’s worksite on Saturday afternoon.

Phillip, who has been arrested four other times as he fought for Aboriginal rights, says he believes it’s his responsibility to help stop the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

Activist and author Naomi Klein also joined the protesters, saying they are sending a message not to the government but to investors that there’s real opposition to the fossil fuel industry in Canada.

Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain project is set to twin an existing pipeline, tripling the flow of oil flowing to the B.C. coast from Alberta.

The RCMP say they have arrested about 200 people demonstrating around the Trans Mountain facilities since mid-March, and while most face charges for civil contempt, officers have also made arrests for mischief, obstruction and assault of a police officer.

The Canadian Press

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