Pipe for the Trans Mountain pipeline is unloaded in Edson, Alta. on Tuesday, June 18, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Canada’s bias meant improper consultations: First Nations challenging pipeline

Chief Leah George-Wilson says Canada had an opportunity to ‘get it right’ but failed

Six First Nations that have filed another legal challenge against the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion say Canada’s ownership of the corporation created a bias that prevented full consultations as ordered by the Federal Court of Appeal.

Chief Leah George-Wilson of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation says Canada had an opportunity to “get it right” but failed to take environmental risks into consideration as part of a rushed consultation process.

The court shelved the original approval last summer and the federal government approved the pipeline expansion again in June after a second round of consultations with First Nations.

George-Wilson says she expects the latest approval will be overturned based on the same mistakes the federal government made the first time around with its failure to conduct meaningful consultations.

READ MORE: Environmental groups challenge Trans Mountain, citing killer whale concerns

Lawyer Merle Alexander, who represents the Shxw’owhamel First Nation near Hope, says the nation that initially supported the pipeline chose to oppose it because an oil spill would destroy its sacred burial and archeological sites as well as the community’s sole source of water.

The federal government purchased the pipeline and expansion project for $4.5 billion, saying it was in the national interest to build the country’s energy infrastructure and to preserve jobs.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Community of Vavenby weekly news update

Vavenby Elementary School has two teachers this year as the number of students has increased

Teamster Brad Cameron steps back in the arena

Cameron gets win in the Novice Wagon Competition

Back in Time

Historical Perspective

Alt-right crackpot hunting

Editor, The Times:

VIDEO: Liberals make child care pledge, Greens unveil platform on Day 6 of campaign

Green party leader Elizabeth May unveils her party’s platform in Toronto

B.C. forest industry looks to a high-technology future

Restructuring similar to Europe 15 years ago, executive says

RCMP conclude investigation into 2017 Elephant Hill wildfire

Files have been turned over to BC Prosecution Service

B.C. wants to be part of global resolution in opioid company bankruptcy claim

Government says settlement must include Canadian claims for devastation created by overdose crisis

B.C. ends ‘birth alerts’ in child welfare cases

‘Social service workers will no longer share information about expectant parents without consent’

U.S. student, killed in Bamfield bus crash, remembered as ‘kind, intelligent, talented’

John Geerdes, 18, was one of two UVic students killed in the crash on Friday night

Free Tesla 3 offered with purchase of Surrey townhome

Century Group’s offer for Viridian development runs through Oct. 31

B.C. communities urged to improve access for disabled people

One in four B.C. residents has disability, most want to work

Sikh millworker lodges human rights complaint against Interfor, again

Mander Sohal, fired from Delta’s Acorn Mill, alleges discrimination based on religion and disability

Most Read