Fisheries and Oceans Canada officials and members of the B.C. Wildfire Service move salmon in a temporary holding pen on the Fraser River before being transported with a helicopter past a massive rock slide, near Big Bar, west of Clinton, B.C., on Wednesday July 24, 2019. Authorities dealing with a massive landslide in British Columbia’s Fraser River say they’ve successfully helped thousands of salmon migrate north of the site, but millions of fish remain threatened by the obstruction. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. says salmon can now be transported over Fraser River landslide by truck

Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson has called the landslide a ‘crisis situation’

The B.C. government says salmon stuck at a massive landslide on the Fraser River north of Lilooet can now be transported upstream by truck, as crews conducted a successful trial run on Sunday.

The province says rock scalers have also moved two large boulders as part of ongoing efforts to create a natural passage for fish to swim past the slide on their way to spawning grounds.

To date, an estimated 28,780 salmon have passed the slide on their own, while nearly 57,000 have been transported by helicopter.

The province says water levels continue to drop, making it easier for fish to move upstream while improving conditions for crews working at the slide.

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans, the B.C. government and local First Nations have been working together since June trying to ensure hundreds of thousands of salmon have a chance to spawn.

Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson has called the landslide a “crisis situation” and said 2019 has been an especially difficult year for wild Pacific salmon, while pointing to climate change as the main driving factor in what has been a decades-long decline in stocks.

In one of the most dramatic shifts, Wilkinson’s department adjusted the number of returning Fraser River sockeye expected this year to a little more than 600,000, down from an earlier projection of nearly five million.

READ MORE: About 56,000 salmon now past Big Bar landslide

READ MORE: B.C. First Nations call for closure to commercial, recreational fishing on Fraser River

The Canadian Press

Just Posted

Community of Vavenby weekly news update

Vavenby Elementary School has two teachers this year as the number of students has increased

Teamster Brad Cameron steps back in the arena

Cameron gets win in the Novice Wagon Competition

Back in Time

Historical Perspective

Alt-right crackpot hunting

Editor, The Times:

VIDEO: Liberals make child care pledge, Greens unveil platform on Day 6 of campaign

Green party leader Elizabeth May unveils her party’s platform in Toronto

Canucks sign Brock Boeser to three-year, US$17.6-million deal

Young sniper will be in Vancouver Tuesday

B.C. forest industry looks to a high-technology future

Restructuring similar to Europe 15 years ago, executive says

RCMP conclude investigation into 2017 Elephant Hill wildfire

Files have been turned over to BC Prosecution Service

B.C. wants to be part of global resolution in opioid company bankruptcy claim

Government says settlement must include Canadian claims for devastation created by overdose crisis

B.C. ends ‘birth alerts’ in child welfare cases

‘Social service workers will no longer share information about expectant parents without consent’

U.S. student, killed in Bamfield bus crash, remembered as ‘kind, intelligent, talented’

John Geerdes, 18, was one of two UVic students killed in the crash on Friday night

Free Tesla 3 offered with purchase of Surrey townhome

Century Group’s offer for Viridian development runs through Oct. 31

B.C. communities urged to improve access for disabled people

One in four B.C. residents has disability, most want to work

Most Read