Morgane Oger. (The Canadian Press)

B.C. human rights tribunal rules anti-transgender poster campaign discriminatory

The posters called Morgane Oger a ‘biological male who has renamed himself’

A Vancouver trans woman who made a human rights complaint about a poster campaign that called transgenderism an “impossibility” has won her case.

Morgane Oger ran as an NDP candidate in the 2017 British Columbia election.

In a ruling released Wednesday, the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal says Christian activist William Whatcott resolved to stop her from being elected solely because she is transgender and without researching her platform or policies.

It says Whatcott created and distributed 1,500 flyers calling Oger a ”biological male who has renamed himself … after he embraced a transvestite lifestyle.”

Whatcott expressed concern about the promotion and growth of “homosexuality and transvestitism” and described being transgender as an “impossibility” that constitutes a sin.

The three-member panel found Whatcott’s conduct violated the Human Rights Code because it was discriminatory and likely to expose Oger and other transgender people to hatred or contempt.

It ordered Whatcott to pay Oger $55,000 in costs and compensation.

Panelist Devyn Cousineau writes in the ruling that the discrimination against Oger was severe, intentional and designed to interfere in her participation in political life.

“It drew on the most insidious stereotypes and myths about transgender people and called on the electorate to conclude that Ms. Oger was, by sole virtue of her gender identity, unsuitable for public office,” the decision says.

“I have concluded that the effect of the flyer was to expose Ms. Oger to hatred and contempt. This is unquestionably a serious and damaging form of discrimination.”

READ MORE: Anti-discrimination group wants to map offenders with cross-Canada map

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Author sets her sights on tourism market

Eleanor Deckert promotes reading wholesome

Celebrating advancements in adventure tourism

Mike Wiegele receives doctor of laws degree from TRU

USW shows generosity despite tough times

Canfor employees present cheque for $500 to Clearwater Secondary School’s sports teams

UPDATE: Three wildfires discovered in Clearwater area

All new fires suspected to have been caused by lightning

VIDEO: Huge crowds gather in downtown Toronto for Raptors parade

Mayor John Tory declares it ‘We The North Day’ after team’s historic NBA title win

Federal Liberals’ plan to help first-time homebuyers to kick in weeks before election

Ottawa to pick up 5% of a mortgage on existing homes for households that earn under $120,000 a year

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Most Read