Environment Minister George Heyman (Hansard TV)

B.C. backing Ottawa in Canadian carbon pricing court battle

Saskatchewan, Ontario argue fuel taxes are up to provinces

The B.C. government is intervening in two court cases to back the Justin Trudeau government’s plan to impose carbon tax on provinces that are refusing to impose carbon pricing themselves.

Ontario and Saskatchewan have cases in their appeal courts arguing the federal government doesn’t have jurisdiction to impose fuel taxes on provinces. B.C. already has a carbon tax higher than that required by Ottawa for 2020 and is is concerned about being put at a competitive disadvantage with provinces that don’t, said B.C. Environment Minister George Heyman.

“Greenhouse gases do not respect provincial boundaries or international boundaries for that matter,” Heyman said Tuesday. “We will argue that there will be harm to our competitiveness if other provinces do not put a price on carbon.”

Attorney General David Eby said B.C. will argue that both the provinces and the federal government have a role to play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

“Our position is supported by repeated decisions of the Supreme Court of Canada,” Eby said.

Premier Doug Ford cancelled Ontario’s cap-and-trade system for carbon pricing earlier this year, and fuel prices have dipped below a dollar a litre in recent days. Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe says his province is using carbon capture and storage, and the federal plan makes Saskatchewan’s oil and gas industry uncompetitive.

Ottawa’s legislation requires all provinces to have a price of $10 per tonne of greenhouse gas emissions in place this year, rising by $10 each year until it reaches $50 in 2022. Trudeau has said Ottawa will impose a tax on provinces that don’t implement one, and return the money to each province.

B.C.’s carbon tax is charged on the amount of emission, whatever the price of fuels. This year’s increase, imposed a year earlier than the NDP proposed as a condition of the B.C. Green Party supporting their minority government, brings the carbon tax to $35 a tonne of carbon dioxide or equivalent emissions.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

High winds could lead to dangerous snowmobiling conditions

Advice for staying safe on the mountains Family Day weekend

Clearwater Library hosting open house

Event takes place Feb. 15 from 2—4 p.m.

Province announces $100-million grant funding for Northwest communities

The Northern Capital and Planning Grant will go to four regional districts and 22 municipalities

Road conditions for Feb. 15

Slippery sections on Highway 5

‘Just like Iron Man’: Calgary surgeon undergoes experimental spinal surgery

Dr. Richi Gill was in a freak accident on a boogie board during a family vacation in Hawaii

Homicide police investigate assault turned deadly in Surrey

60-year-old man died at hospital after assault

Trudeau’s principal secretary, Gerald Butts, resigns amid SNC-Lavalin furor

Butts categorically denies the accusation that he or anyone else in the PMO improperly pressured former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould

Deported B.C. man who came to Canada as a baby granted chance at return

Lee Van Heest was deported to the Netherlands in 2017

A Mother’s Wish: Ryan Shtuka’s mother wants her son to be ‘forever known’

‍‍‍‍‍“Let me tell you a story …. it all began with a boy named Ryan”

Sex abuse survivors to meet with Vatican summit organizers

Pope Francis has urged participants to meet with abuse victims before they came to Rome

Ex-FBI official: ‘Crime may have been committed’ by Trump

Andrew McCabe said FBI had good reason to open a counterintelligence investigation into whether Trump was in league with Russia

Most Read