FILE - This Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017, file image provided by the North Korean government on Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017, shows what the North Korean government calls the Hwasong-15 intercontinental ballistic missile, at an undisclosed location in North Korea. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)

Airline crew witnesses North Korea missile test

A Cathay Pacific crew witnessed North Korea’s recent missile test

The crew of a Cathay Pacific flight saw what it believes was North Korea’s latest missile test last week, the second airline to report sighting it.

Cathay said Monday that the flight from San Francisco to Hong Kong reported witnessing the apparent re-entry of the ICBM that North Korea launched before dawn Wednesday.

The missile was far from the plane, and operation was unaffected, Cathay said, adding that it had informed other carriers and relevant authorities.

“At the moment, no one is changing any routes or operating parameters,” the Hong Kong-based airline said in a statement. “We remain alert and (will) review the situation as it evolves.”

The North Korean missile was fired very high up, reaching an altitude of 4,475 kilometres (2,780 miles) before falling back into the Sea of Japan about 950 kilometres (600 miles) from where it was launched. It was in the air for 53 minutes.

Related: N. Korea fires missile it says is ‘significantly more’ powerful

The Hwasong-15 intercontinental ballistic missile demonstrated a greater range than other missiles North Korea has tested. One expert estimated its range at more than 13,000 kilometres (8,100 miles) if launched on a standard trajectory, which would put Washington, D.C., within reach.

Korean Air pilots on two different planes also reported seeing flashes of light believed to be the North Korean missile when they were flying over Japan, airline spokesman Cho Hyun-mook said.

The flights, one from San Francisco and the other from Los Angeles, were both headed for Incheon, the main airport serving Seoul, South Korea.

Related: North Korea ‘brings us closer to war’

The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Moose Hide campaign sees annual growth

“It was awesome—from last year to this year it was amazing,” said co-organizer Cindy Wilgosh

Road conditions for Feb. 21

Electrical maintenance planned on Highway 5

B.C. Interior free from measles

Vancouver measles outbreak hasn’t spread to the B.C. Interior

B.C. BUDGET: Surplus $374 million after bailouts of BC Hydro, ICBC

Growth projected stronger in 2020, Finance Minister Carole James says

Back in Time

Historical Perspective

New report calls for regulated heroin sales to curb B.C.’s overdose problem

B.C. Centre on Substance Use points to organized crime and money-laundering as contributing factors

Millennial men least likely to have a family doctor: Statistics Canada

Report found more women have primary care physicians, compared with men

70% of Canadians agree with mandatory vaccines for children: poll

The debate for pro and anti vaccinations has heated up after a measles outbreak in Vancouver

VIDEO: Woman, off-duty cop in serious condition after stabbing outside B.C. elementary school

The officer was interceding in an alleged assault when he and the woman were stabbed

‘A little baloney’ in PM’s claim about solicitor-client privilege on SNC-Lavalin

The Conservatives and NDP want Trudeau to waive that privilege so Wilson-Raybould can offer her side of the story

Proposed edible pot rules are wasteful, would leave products tasteless: critics

When Canada legalized weed last fall, it only allowed fresh or dried bud, oil, plants and seeds

Samsung folding phone is different – but also almost $2,000

But most analysts see a limited market for foldable-screen phones

Most Read