B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks in Vancouver, on Thursday, September 16, 2021. Premier John Horgan says an ecologically sensitive watershed near the U.S. border is one step closer to protection thanks to an agreement extinguishing mining claims in the area. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks in Vancouver, on Thursday, September 16, 2021. Premier John Horgan says an ecologically sensitive watershed near the U.S. border is one step closer to protection thanks to an agreement extinguishing mining claims in the area. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

LETTER: Politicians and mea culpa

Letter to the editor

To the editor,

Mea culpa? Yes, it would be good if most or all of us could do this from time to time, wouldn’t it?

John Horgan made his mistakes, but they were not serious. In general, Horgan’s NDP represented a fairly decent government. Not perfect, but then what is?

True, Glen Clark possibly should have done a mea culpa on the fast ferries but these craft, which were sold for a song, practically given away, one might say.

The biggest mea culpa in B.C.’s history is to the populace of B.C. who, panicked by a corrupt corporate-owned media, stumbled to the poles to give that horrible Gordon Campbell a virtual dictatorship.

As George Abbot (and he should know) pointed out, Campbell got it wrong right from the start. Without properly consulting the books, Campbell immediately gave a tax cut, a large tax cut, which of course favoured the province’s “needy rich.”

There’s a double irony here. Before the fall of Glen Clark there was this chatter about how bad B.C.’s finances were, again spurred by B.C.’s corporate media. Well, by the time Campbell had handed out the huge tax cuts, the finances of B.C. were in perilous shape.

So what was Campbell’s answer? Sell off the province of B.C. in parts and pieces. The accounting section of BC Hydro to Enron Accenture – remember Enron?

Not only that, but most of the Liberals’ building projects (Port Mann Bridge for example) came in so fr over budget that they made Clark’s fast ferries look like small potatoes indeed.

Finally stopped Campbell on his attempt to sell the Coquihalla, then put his boots to his skinny backside out the door on the HST. Now, to reiterate, the HST in itself was not a bad idea. Campbell had it all stacked in favour of B.C.’s “needy rich.” With nine per cent approval rating, he was gone. Off to become advisor on privatization for Doug Ford and Brain Pallister.

The last one heard of Gordon Campbell, some woman was suing him for inappropriate touching. Don’t forget, Kevin Falcon was Campbell’s right-hand hatchet man, want him for premier?

Mea cupla – you bet.

Dennis Peacock,

Clearwater, B.C.



newsroom@clearwatertimes.com

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