FILE - Former justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould walks from West Block on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Thursday, Feb. 28, 2019. Wilson-Raybould is now running as an Independent candidate in the Vancouver Granville riding after leaving the Liberal party over the SNC Lavallin affair, and held a rally on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019 as part of her campaign. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld)

‘Colouring outside party lines’: Wilson-Raybould pledges non-partisan approach at campaign rally

Independent candidate said she will address issues such as climate change

Political trailblazer Jody Wilson-Raybould committed to pursue truth and change through non-partisan co-operation at a campaign rally in Vancouver on Sept. 18 — a message that was backed by a guest appearance by Green Leader Elizabeth May.

Wilson-Raybould is running as an Independent in one of the most-watched ridings of Vancouver – Granville after leaving the Liberal party over the SNC Lavallin affair.

She told the crowd that addressing issues that affect all Canadians, such as climate change, will require “colouring outside party lines.”

May told reporters after the rally that Louise Boutin, a real estate agent who is running for the Greens in the riding, was aware of her plan to support Raybould-Wilson.

Wilson-Raybould is hoping to hold the seat against Liberal party challenger, Taleeb Noormohamed, a 42–year-old tech entrepreneur.

Also running in the riding is climate activist Yvonne Hanson for the NDP, former Ottawa political staffer Zach Segal for the Conservatives, and Naomi Chocyk, a one-time constituency staffer for Wilson-Raybould, for the People’s Party of Canada.

READ MORE: Jody Wilson Raybould’s book on reconciliation to be released Sept. 20

Wilson-Raybould, who was once a B.C. regional chief of the Assembly of First Nations, quickly became one of the stars Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his team promoted heavily in their 2015 bid for power.

But Wilson-Raybould precipitated a crisis for Trudeau’s government last winter with allegations she had been inappropriately pressured by the prime minister, his office, other ministers and bureaucrats to end the criminal prosecution of Montreal engineering giant SNC-Lavalin.

Wilson-Raybould quit Trudeau’s cabinet over the affair, followed by cabinet ally Jane Philpott. Trudeau eventually kicked both women out of the Liberal caucus and they are now seeking re-election as Independent candidates.

Philpott, who also spoke at the rally, told the crowd that independent voices can make a difference in the House of Commons.

“Do not ever doubt what one person can do,” Philpott said. “We will not be silent and we will not stand down.”

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Back in Time

Historical Perspective

Brent Mason brings a night of music and storytelling to Clearwater

Mason will be playing at the Dutch Lake Community Centre on Feb. 26

Clearwater mayor unimpressed with Forest Minister’s inaction on local tenure transfer

Mayor Merlin Blackwell says he’s ready to lead delegation to Victoria

Editor, The Times

Local vet valued for compassion and professionalism

Editor, The Times

Re: The World Thru the Eyes of the Rambling Man

VIDEO: 2020 BC Winter Games wrap up in Fort St. John as torch passes to Maple Ridge

More than 1,000 athletes competed in the 2020 BC Winter Games

‘A long way to go’: UNBC hosts Moose Hide Campaign gathering on Feb. 24

The event is a part of a movement to stand up against violence inflicted on women and children

Still six cases of COVID-19 in B.C. despite reports of Air Canada passenger: ministry

Health ministry wouldn’t comment on specific flight routes

Violent ends to past Indigenous protests haunt Trudeau government

Trudeau adopted a more assertive tone Friday, insisting the barricade must come down

HIGHLIGHTS: Day one and two at the 2020 BC Winter Games

Athletes had sunny – but cold – weather to work with in Fort St. John

B.C. money laundering inquiry to begin amid hopes for answers, accountability

Eby argued that most B.C. residents already know the previous government, at best, turned a blind eye

Blockades remain in place as Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs returning to B.C.

Hereditary Chief Woos said they are ready to engage in nation-to-nation talks with the B.C.

Most Read