Members of the Vavenby School PAC pose with their kids at the concession during a craft fair at the Vavenby Hall on Nov. 5. Pictured are (back, l-r) Christina Fillion, Katherine Chrystall, Allison Weber, Caila Loring, (front, l-r) Nathaniel Weber, Kelsey Rexin, Isabelle Stein and Lindsay Stein.

Members of the Vavenby School PAC pose with their kids at the concession during a craft fair at the Vavenby Hall on Nov. 5. Pictured are (back, l-r) Christina Fillion, Katherine Chrystall, Allison Weber, Caila Loring, (front, l-r) Nathaniel Weber, Kelsey Rexin, Isabelle Stein and Lindsay Stein.

Vavenby hosts Christmas craft fair

By the end of the day approximately 100 had attended

Robyn Rexin

Vavenby had its Christmas craft fair on Sunday, Nov. 5. People started arriving before the doors opened and by the end of the day approximately 100 had attended.

There were 13 vendors selling a real mixture of items.

The craft fair’s organizer, Barb Pennell, had a table of her creations, such as cookie and treat jars with mouse heads on them that had different dresses for the various holidays, cheese graters on stands with small wreaths around them, and different sized “boots” to be used instead of Christmas stockings.

Lorene Easson had three tables made up of Norwex products such as cleaning cloths, Scentsy diffusers and waxes, etc. Cassie Sills had a table of Jamberry products.

READ MORE: Vavenby hosts craft sales

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Dr. Helmcken Memorial Hospital Auxiliary needed three tables for the wares from their thrift store, and Rebecca Tomlinson sold jewelry.

Hollie Matina was back selling her delicious cupcakes, cakes, nut caramel crunch, and almond butter crunch. Joey Bedard had a table of his own pies and cookies.

Amanda Thompson sold her own product, Bar None Soap, as well as knitted scarves, neck warmers, and toques.

There were two tables of homemade jewelry created by Deborah Smart, one table of products for bathing made by Hayley Tromp, and two tables where Shannon Ludtke was selling hooded towels, crayon caddies, head bands, tooth fairy pillows, and more.

Cabot Homestead made its second appearance at the bazaar, selling their naturally-raised pork. For anyone wishing to buy more of this meat, Cabot will be coming to Vavenby’s Fine Things Thrift Store the first Sunday of every month starting in January 2018.

Two authors were present. Kay Knox was selling her first book, Gentle Journey – Memoirs of a Traveling Gal. It was hot off the press and she received it the day before her birthday.

Knox said, “It was the best 80th birthday present ever.”

The other writer was Wayne Russell. He was selling both his books, The Good Weeds and The Family Weed: Book Two. Russell said that he had received over 500 emails to write his second book.

Besides his books, Russell and his partner Doug Richardson had feathers and items made from feathers for sale.

Danielle White Frog, wife of the late Bert Gablehaus, had collected all of these various-sized feathers and made fans out of some.

Russell and Richardson handed out small feathers to each of the children who proudly wore them in their hair.

There was a concession to sate everyone’s appetite. It was run by the Vavenby Primary School’s parent advisory committee (PAC).

There was soup, buns, hot dogs, banana bread, carrot cake, and cinnamon buns to eat with coffee, tea, hot chocolate, and water to drink.

All items were donated and people paid by donation. The money raised was going towards the school. The mothers working in the kitchen had their children present so people could see who the money would be used for.

The concession did well and the women said, “The Vavenby PAC would like to thank everybody for their outstanding support.”

 

Cassie Sills and her daughter Hannah sell Jamberry products during Vavenby’s Christmas craft sale.                                Photo by Robyn Rexin

Cassie Sills and her daughter Hannah sell Jamberry products during Vavenby’s Christmas craft sale. Photo by Robyn Rexin