Pick your fruit to reduce wildlife conflict

Fruit is abundant in this region and is a very strong wildlife attractant, second only to garbage

WildsafeBC

This time of year bear activity is on the rise as they start to fatten up for winter. Bear sightings are increasing both in the backcountry and around homes.

It is so important that we all do our part to reduce wildlife conflicts in our communities. You can help by keeping fruit picked from your trees and bushes as it becomes ripe, and cleaning up windfall before it rots. Fruit is abundant in this region and is a very strong wildlife attractant, second only to garbage.

You might not mind sacrificing your fruit to the bears, but you are not doing them any favours by letting them feed in your yard. Bears become easily food-conditioned and as they lose their fear of humans become a danger to themselves and us.

It is important that we keep bears away from our homes so that no one gets hurt. Ask your friends to come pick fruit, if you have too much to manage yourself.

Many communities have soup kitchens or food banks that can take the extra fruit. Consider starting a gleaning group and put social media to work to help share the fruit. Try heavy pruning to get less, but better quality fruit next year. Also, consider replacing your trees with non-fruit bearing trees.

WildSafeBC is an educational program delivered in partnership with the BC Conservation Foundation and the TNRD. This program strives to keep wildlife wild and communities safe in all aspects of our lives, including how we live, work, play and grow. For more tips and information on reducing human-wildlife conflict, visit www.wildsafebc.com, follow WildSafeBC TNRD on Facebook, or contact Mandy Ross, your local coordinator at tnrd@wildsafebc.com.

 

WildSafeBC TNRD is supported by BC Ministry of Environment, British Columbia Conservation Foundation, and Thompson-Nicola Regional District.

 

 

Just Posted

SLIDESHOW: Blue River cross-country ski races awards ceremony

A lot of proud youngsters following the races – justifiably proud

SLIDESHOW: Blue River cross-country ski races – part three

Third part of three-part slideshow of races held Wednesday

SLIDESHOW: Blue River cross-country ski races – part two

Part three of race slideshow plus awards event still to come

COFI seeks 2018 forestry scholarship applicants

Ten $1,500 scholarships are awarded to students pursuing a career in the forest industry

SLIDESHOW: Blue River cross-country ski races – part one

More photos of ski races plus awards ceremony to come

President praises nearly 1,800 volunteers at B.C. Games

Ashley Wadhwani sits down with the Kamloops 2018 B.C. Winter Games President Niki Remesz

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

Bobsleigh team misses Olympic medal finish

Canadian team finishes four-man event 0.84 seconds behind first place, 0.31 seconds from podium

B.C. Games: Athletes talk Team Canada at PyeongChang 2018

From Andi Naudie to Evan McEachran there’s an Olympian for every athlete to look up to

Snowboarders sliding into fresh territory at B.C. Games

Athletes hit the slopes for first appearance as an event at the B.C. Winter Games in Kamloops

Cariboo woman raises funds for Seizure Investigation Unit beds at VGH

VGH Foundation gets VCH approval to begin fundraising for SIU beds; local efforts are paying off

Looking back at the 1979 B.C. Games: Good memories, even better jackets

39 years later, Kamloops is hosting the Winter Games again, with some volunteers returning

OLYMPICS 101: Oldest and youngest Canadians to reach the podium

This year, Canada sent its most athletes in Winter Games history, here’s a look at record breakers

BCHL Today: Cowichan Caps play spoiler and Nanaimo wins 10th straight game

BCHL Today is a (near) daily look at what’s going on around the league and the junior A world.

Most Read