Pick your fruit to reduce wildlife conflict

Fruit is abundant in this region and is a very strong wildlife attractant, second only to garbage

WildsafeBC

This time of year bear activity is on the rise as they start to fatten up for winter. Bear sightings are increasing both in the backcountry and around homes.

It is so important that we all do our part to reduce wildlife conflicts in our communities. You can help by keeping fruit picked from your trees and bushes as it becomes ripe, and cleaning up windfall before it rots. Fruit is abundant in this region and is a very strong wildlife attractant, second only to garbage.

You might not mind sacrificing your fruit to the bears, but you are not doing them any favours by letting them feed in your yard. Bears become easily food-conditioned and as they lose their fear of humans become a danger to themselves and us.

It is important that we keep bears away from our homes so that no one gets hurt. Ask your friends to come pick fruit, if you have too much to manage yourself.

Many communities have soup kitchens or food banks that can take the extra fruit. Consider starting a gleaning group and put social media to work to help share the fruit. Try heavy pruning to get less, but better quality fruit next year. Also, consider replacing your trees with non-fruit bearing trees.

WildSafeBC is an educational program delivered in partnership with the BC Conservation Foundation and the TNRD. This program strives to keep wildlife wild and communities safe in all aspects of our lives, including how we live, work, play and grow. For more tips and information on reducing human-wildlife conflict, visit www.wildsafebc.com, follow WildSafeBC TNRD on Facebook, or contact Mandy Ross, your local coordinator at tnrd@wildsafebc.com.

 

WildSafeBC TNRD is supported by BC Ministry of Environment, British Columbia Conservation Foundation, and Thompson-Nicola Regional District.

 

 

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