Visitors at the Sixties Scoop exhibit during its stop at the Cranbrook History Centre on May 11, 2022. The exhibit will be in Kamloops on June 4 for one day only. (Photo credit: Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta)

Visitors at the Sixties Scoop exhibit during its stop at the Cranbrook History Centre on May 11, 2022. The exhibit will be in Kamloops on June 4 for one day only. (Photo credit: Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta)

One-day Sixties Scoop exhibition at Kamloops Library on June 4

Travelling exhibit shares stories of the Sixties Scoop and its survivors

The Thompson-Nicola Regional Library (TNRL) invites the public to learn about what was lost when Indigenous children were separated from their families and communities during the Sixties Scoop during a special one-day event.

The Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta (SSISA), in partnership with the TNRL, is bringing the “Bi-Giwen: Coming Home – Truth Telling from the Sixties Scoop” exhibit to the downtown Kamloops Library on Victoria Street for one day only, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, June 4.

This first-of-its-kind travelling exhibit shares the history of the Sixties Scoop and the stories of its survivors, and includes 12 personal testimonials of strength and resilience. There will be welcoming remarks when the exhibit is unveiled at 10 a.m.

The Sixties Scoop refers to government practices across Canada from the 1950s to the 1980s which led to an unknown number of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit children being taken from their parents, families, and communities by child intervention services and placed in non-Indigenous families.

Many of these children experienced abuse, mistreatment, and neglect. They also lost touch with their families, communities, culture, and traditional language, and the effects are still felt by survivors and their families today.

“The Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta is proud to bring this exhibit to Kamloops that describes the powerful and emotional stories and devastating impacts of Sixties Scoop in Canada,” says Sandra Relling, SSISA President.

“We are grateful for the ongoing support of the Kamloops Library as we showcase this exhibit throughout B.C. The exhibit is an opportunity to share and educate Canadians about the history of Indigenous people in relation to the Sixties Scoop.”



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Indigenous reconcilliationThompson Nicola Regional District