Moose management gets $1.2-million boost in light of Gorley report

The Province is investing to help increase moose populations following the release of a multi-level strategy

A bull moose rests in a meadow.

Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations

VICTORIA – The Province is investing $1.2 million to help increase moose populations following the release of a multi-level strategy to restore B.C.’s moose populations, Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Minister Steve Thomson announced recently.

The funding is a response to the Strategy to Help Restore Moose Populations in British Columbia by Al Gorley, which advises government to set priorities in key regions and enhance the integration of moose management with other land use activities.

“This initiative and additional resources will help us immediately address some of the recommendations in Gorley’s report,” Thomson said. “The funding helps us take action to support moose, while ensuring that British Columbia remains at the forefront of wildlife management.”

The Province is acting on all 21 recommendations in the report. Some of the immediate actions taken include:

• Reducing the number of limited-entry hunts for moose cows and calves from 1,792 in 2011 to 200 in 2016.

• Preparing moose management plans for the Peace, Omineca and Cariboo regions.

• Using existing tools to increase habitat protection.

• Expanding moose survey work planned for this winter to include calf mortality.

The moose strategy report was prepared by Al Gorley who consulted with numerous First Nations – including the Tsilhqot’in National Government, Tahltan and Okanagan Nation Alliance – the B.C. Wildlife Federation, the Guide and Outfitters Association of B.C., the Wildlife Stewardship Council, the B.C. Cattlemen’s Association, and the Council of Forest Industries.

Al Gorley, author of Strategy to Help Restore Moose Populations in British Columbia said, “After hearing concerns from people across the province I am very encouraged to see the government is moving ahead with the strategy.”

This new funding is in addition to the $750,000 British Columbia is already spending on moose management this year. The new money is earmarked for on-the-ground activities like habitat enhancement and decommissioning unused forest service roads, which can affect moose survival, as well as research activities.

 

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