Canadian Cancer Society launches April daffodil campaign

Hearing the words “You have cancer” profoundly alters lives

Three daffodils make bright splashes of colour as Raft Peak looms in the background. The flowers are the symbol of Canadian Cancer Society's annual  April fundraising campaign.

Three daffodils make bright splashes of colour as Raft Peak looms in the background. The flowers are the symbol of Canadian Cancer Society's annual April fundraising campaign.

TORONTO – Hearing the words “You have cancer” profoundly alters lives and the Canadian Cancer Society urges Canadians to join with them to change cancer forever.

“We’ve reached a tipping point and now, more than ever, we need Canadians’ support,” says Pamela Fralick, President and CEO, Canadian Cancer Society. “Every donation made during our April Daffodil campaign will bring us one step closer to preventing cancer, detecting it earlier, improving treatments and helping Canadians live longer, healthier lives.”

Thanks to donors the Society has funded billions in cancer research since the 1940s, resulting in advances that have improved the lives of Canadians. Donors have also made it possible for the Society to become the country’s most trusted source of information and support for people living with cancer and their families. Current statistics show that progress has been made – today over 60 per cent of Canadians diagnosed with cancer will survive at least five years after their diagnosis. In the 1940s, survival was about 25 per cent.

“The generosity of donors has brought us to an exciting threshold and there is great optimism for a future where we will no longer have to fear the word cancer,” says Fralick. “But work remains to be done and the need for your continued support grows with each passing day.”

Current statistics show that the number of new cancer cases continues to rise steadily as the Canadian population grows and ages.  Almost half of all Canadians are expected to develop cancer in their lifetimes and it is the leading cause of death in this country. Last year, an estimated 187,000 new cases of cancer were diagnosed and 75,500 Canadians died from the disease.

“Change won’t happen without you,” says Fralick. “Donating to the Society makes you part of a vibrant cross-Canada team that is working to transform the way we understand this disease and live with it.”