Book brings back memories of the Occupy movement

There was an air of optimism following the recent collapse of the U.S. monetary system

Editor, The Times:

I recently purchased a copy of Chris Hedges’ and Joe Sacco’s book, “Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt.” Although I sometimes find Hedges to be somewhat preachy and pedantic, one might say he and I are on the same side. Sacco’s great illustrations are one of the best reasons to own this book.

The text covers the conditions in places such as the Appalachians and other equally impoverished areas of the U.S. of A. – places where the Great American Dream has never touched.

What came home to me personally was Hedge’s final essay on the Occupy movement. Written while this movement was still in motion, it was full of optimism for the future. But then so were Matt Taibbi and many others, including me and my youngest daughter — we both took minor roles in the Occupy Vancouver movement.

There was an air of optimism following the recent collapse of the U.S. monetary system. During the years 2007-08, with the biggest dose of ‘socialism’ in history (some $5 trillion upfront – final tally – $14 trillion final losses), surely there would be an awakening on the part of the populace.

As Richard Wolff stated, the American Dream isn’t there anymore – the system has lost its moral compass, etc. It’s time for major change.

Unlike the U.S. experience, when Occupy Vancouver was ordered closed, we peaceful Canadians folded our tents and departed for parts unknown.

That did not happen in Turcotte Park, which is close to Wall Street in New York City, the heart of American capitalism. In came the riot police, pepper spray, high pressure hose – the works. Chris Hedges himself was arrested and jailed. Nothing could be allowed to challenge Wall Street.

I won’t go into why the Occupy movement didn’t have more of an effect. Or did it?

For me, reading Chris Hedges was a poignant trip down memory lane.

Dennis Peacock

Clearwater, B.C.